1

When I run FullExample program from TinyGPS++, I get following types of entries,

Sats HDOP Latitude   Longitude   Fix  Date       Time     Date Alt    Course Speed Card  Distance Course Card  Chars Sentences Checksum
          (deg)      (deg)       Age                      Age  (m)    --- from GPS ----  ---- to London  ----  RX    RX        Fail
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

0    9999 ********** *********** **** 07/01/2016 07:32:50 689  ****** ****** ***** ***   ******** ****** ***   75128 0         0        
0    9999 ********** *********** **** 07/01/2016 07:32:51 857  ****** ****** ***** ***   ******** ****** ***   75389 0         0        
0    9999 ********** *********** **** 07/01/2016 07:32:52 864  ****** ****** ***** ***   ******** ****** ***   75642 0         0        
0    9999 ********** *********** **** 07/01/2016 07:32:53 870  ****** ****** ***** ***   ******** ****** ***   75895 0         0        
0    9999 ********** *********** **** 07/01/2016 07:32:54 878  ****** ****** ***** ***   ******** ****** ***   76148 0         0

Other details:
GPSBaud = 9600;
RXPin = 11;
TXPin = 10
Module: GY-NEO6MV2

  • you've failed to mention which GPS module – Jaromanda X Jul 1 '16 at 9:29
  • @JaromandaX: I have updated he module name. – Rorschach Jul 1 '16 at 9:43
2

That is a perfect printout of a GPS system that can see zero satellites.

The fact that the timestamps are one second apart shows that you have correctly interfaced with the GPS device. Now, the GPS device has to 'interface' with the satellites!

Many people don't realise two things:

  1. The GPS antenna really does need a clear view of the sky. A tiny view through a window may show one or two satellites, but you need a minimum of three, and preferaby four or more at a number of points around the sky to get a fix.
  2. If the GPS unit has been completely powered off (called 'cold'), when it first powers on it has NO idea where anything is. It simply listens for any signal anywhere until it "hears" the current time. It can then guess where satellites might be, and listens for updates on satellite positions.

All of this listening, guessing and waiting takes time before it can start to actually lock on to satellites and start to get a fix. This time could easily be 90 seconds or more - you need to be patient. Check your GPS device specifications for "cold start" times.

Edit

I'm impressed! The GY-NEO6MV2 that you list has a cold-start of 27 seconds - but that assumes it has a clear view of the sky.

  • Yes, putting it outside, I get 6 sats. Thanks. – Rorschach Jul 4 '16 at 17:26

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