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I burned the bootloader in ATtiny45 with the Arduino tool.

  1. I want to know how much memory it has taken.
  2. Is this bootloader the same code of a bootloader used in the 328P or other chips?
  3. Can I see this code in any way, to know how it works?

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  • no, it's not the same bootloader. well, a tiny part of it might be, read up on bootloaders. – dandavis Oct 8 '17 at 20:51
  • What bootloader? Please edit your question to post a link to where you got this "bootloader" from. – per1234 Oct 8 '17 at 21:59
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1) I want to know how much memory it has taken

Look to see how big the bootloader is. If it's a HEX file you will either want to load it into a HEX (Intel HEX, not hexadecimal representation) file editor, or convert it to binary with avr-objcopy.

$ avr-objcopy -I ihex <hex file> -O binary <bin file>

2) and if this bootloader is the same code of a bootloader used in the 328P or other chips

No, each chip requires its own special bootloader - simply because all chips are different: that's why they exist. If they were all the same there would only be one chip.

3) Can I see this code in any way, to know how it works ?

If it's open source and you download the bootloader from wherever it's stored (probably Github somewhere), then yes, you can. Of course, that also assumes that you would understand what you are seeing which, judging by this question, is not that likely.

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    The '45 doesn't have an actual UART so I suspect that the "bootloader" is just a stub that allows the IDE to set the fuses properly. – Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Oct 8 '17 at 21:13
  • Or... it uses software serial, or it uses software USB (as the digisparks do on the '85). – Majenko Oct 8 '17 at 21:15

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