Hot answers tagged

10

The best thing to do is, of course, to use a PCB. But it doesn't need to be a custom PCB; there are plenty of pre-made PCBs that are usable for approximately 98% of designs. Here are just a few: Adafruit Perma-Proto boards are connected just like breadboards, so direct transfer is possible. BusBoard proto boards come in a ridiculous variety of ...


7

Search for male-male jumper wire. Some of what you'll find is individual wires but there are also many that are connected together and you can rip off the width you need. Here's one from Adafruit but there is no shortage of them on ebay/amazon.


6

I think the wire itself is perfectly normal. It looks like he's simply soldered right-angled header pins onto the ends. That way, the wires can lie flat on the breadboard instead of being bent over for connections, meaning the whole thing is lower-profile and a little easier to route neatly. It also has the advantage that they will probably survive far more ...


6

There are jumper wires that have a female header on one end and a male header on the other. Example: https://www.sparkfun.com/products/9140 You could also attatch several wired to a strip of breakaway female headers, such as https://www.sparkfun.com/products/115


6

It looks like the Grove connector is proprietary. I emailed Seeedstudio, and they directed me to this datasheet. Unless I'm reading it incorrectly, it doesn't appear to correspond to any type of JST connector, although it's similar. It has 2mm pin spacing, which would make it closest to the JST-PH type, but all the other dimensions are slightly different.


6

Here is the updated link on the seed website. http://wiki.seeedstudio.com/wiki/File:3470130P1.pdf Also note that Digikey now stocks seeedstudio stuff. http://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/seeed-technology-co-ltd/110990030/1597-1082-ND/5482560 http://www.digikey.ca/product-detail/en/seeed-technology-co-ltd/110990037/1597-1083-ND/5482561


6

You can interface arduino to telephone line using MT8870D chip. This IC can decode DTMF tones. Below is a reference schematic from the datasheet. Another popular design floating on the internet is below: There are pre-build modules available from futurelec : You can use Holtek HT9200 IC to encode DTMF that can be interfaced with Arduino. Below is the ...


6

They are what is known as Pull-Up resistors. The circuit will not work if you replace them with wires. Not only that but you will short circuit the power supply when you press a button. Why don't you want to use resistors? The value is not important - you could use the same value as you are using for the LED if you don't have the 10k resistors shown in ...


5

I believe this is the genuine article: Wire to Board connector > PITCH 2.00mm > 1125 Series Good luck finding a vendor!


4

Again similar to Sachleen's answer. You can crimp your own connectors onto a ribbon cable, that way you can have the desired header size. I've just done this manually with some pliers (I couldn't afford the crimping tool) a bit tricky but I'm pleased with the results. I got all of the bits I needed from www.hobbytronics.co.uk. Anywho I'm happy with the ...


4

Learning to design a PCB can be a challenge. First, there's software choices, there's file formats, and then actually laying out a good board. That's before production and assembly, each with its own struggles along the way. It's no different than the first time you open Xcode and learn about Storyboards and Frameworks and Simulators and all that, or for ...


4

It is just so obvious that you should connect them that they did not bother to write it down. The reader needs power. That is taken as read. Without power it can do nothing. Why would they bother to waste time telling you to connect the things that you have to connect regardless? The only things that they tell you to connect are things that are specific to ...


4

Try out this connection. It will helpful.


4

The ESP8266 already has a bootloader to upload new firmware over UART. You don't need to burn anything, and you don't use SPI to program it. AVR microcontrollers are programmed (aka flashed, or uploaded) using ISP (in-system programming) over SPI. They don't support programming over UART out of the box. To receive new firmware over the serial port, a ...


4

SCK and SCL are the same thing. Serial ClocK Serial CLock They seem to be interchangeable. The fact you have SDA (Serial DAta) as opposed to separate SDI / SDO or MOSI / MISO pins means it's I2C. Wire it like you would any other I2C device.


4

Certainly go for RJ45 sockets. Not only does it help protect the wire, but it gives you a really easy way of swapping the wire for different lengths should you want to. You can't solder an RJ45 socket directly to a normal prototyping board. The pins aren't in the right pattern. So, you could go for something like this That can then either be soldered to ...


4

A signal is just a varying voltage. A wire is just a (very long) small resistor. The device reading the signal is just a current sink. That's three terms there: voltage, resistance, and current. Three terms you should know are related by Ohm's Law. Also, some simple rules: The thinner the wire the bigger the resistance The longer the wire the bigger the ...


3

It is not a JST connector. There are ramps on the side of the connector that won't allow the grove/seeed cables slide into the connectors. After I shaved/cut off the ramps, to allow them to fit into the connector, I found that the pins are slightly offset in there vertical alignment. This appears to be a custom connector. However, if anyone knows better, I ...


3

You can use Arduino proto shield. It's a prototyping board shaped the way it can be plugged into the Arduino. There are over 9000 of them from different manufacturers. Then just solder the stuff you need on the proto shield.


3

Using a stripboard is perfectly convenient to create a circuit that: will last longer than a breadboard prototype will cost less than wasting a breadboard for a long time Stripboards can be found in any good electronics retailer (I buy mines at Conrad). You will need a soldering iron (and the skills that are needed for it, but that is not so difficult as ...


3

Although Sachleen's answer is preferable in a lot of situations, there are a few other options that you have. Quick note on his answer: I find clamping a row of those wires together and rubbing a thin line of superglue over the connectors a useful way to keep them together. It's not very neat, but it works pretty well and, with that many wires connected, ...


3

Depends what you’re doing. For low power (< 12v, 500mA) peripherals and digital signals: If you’re going to use breadboard (and you really should start with breadboard) you’ll need solid core hook up wire. You can find pre-cut, pre-stripped sets with a variety of lengths and colours if you’re looking for neatness and simplicity. (An example can be ...


3

A wire wrap tool can work well for this - the wrappings tend to be fairly secure if done right, though the wire itself can break if stressed.


3

Here's what you need to do: Leave the VINs disconnected. I'm not sure that it's a bad idea, but it is pretty much pointless. Like sburlappp said, the resistors lower the voltage between them (and reduce the current). With a resistor, it wouldn't hurt it, but there's really no need. Connect the grounds directly. Here's the problem: voltage is relative; it is ...


3

The VCC lines aren't directly connected - you just have a shared data line with some voltage on it, which is always lower than VCC because of the resistor. Each device "talks" to the I2C bus by briefly connecting those lines to GND, which is common between both devices. Current is limited by the pull-up resistor, so it never gets too high. This makes it safe ...


3

All voltages are ground referenced, hence the ground is the only (supply) connection required. Remote modules can be self-powered and signals will still be discriminated as long as ground is connected.


3

I just tried it (using my own method), and I got it working with very good sensitivity (should be fine for two people) using a TIP102 Darlington transistor and some resistors. Here is what I did: R1, the 1M pulldown resistor on the first pin of the Darlington is necessary to keep the light off when nobody is touching the wires. Without this, the light will ...


3

What I do in situations like that is get some of those breadboard hookup wires, like you have in your second photo, cut them in the middle (giving yourself two wires, each with a bare end, and a end with a plug on them). Strip the bare end, and then solder it to the servo motor wires. Before commencing soldering, slip some heat-shrink tubing onto the wire. ...


3

You might be on the wrong track. You do need a crystal (or not, it depends on), and an Atmel programmer if you want to program an empty chip. However, all Arduino boards come with a chip pre-programmed with a bootloader. Then it is rather easy: you need an FTDI cable to connect the board to a PC. Then run Arduino IDE on the PC. (The FTDI cable is actually ...


3

With I2C you always need pull up resistors on the data lines, otherwise nothing works. Normally ones around 4.7K for a Uno, not sure what they should be for a Tiny. If you are unsure about the I2C address get "I2CScanner" (An Arduino program) and that will tell you.


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