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16

Arduino has recently changed to using a different bootloader on their official Nano boards that communicates at 115200 baud rather than the previous 57600 baud. Support for these new boards was added in Arduino AVR Boards 1.6.21. The new Nano board definition is not compatible with old Nanos and likely most 3rd party Nanos so backwards compatibility is ...


5

They Keyboard.press() command accept modifiers per the documentation. You may need to do multiple press() commands before releasing. For example, if you want to launch File Explorer you could use: Keyboard.press(KEY_LEFT_GUI); Keyboard.press('e'); Keyboard.releaseAll(); This is equivalent to shortcut keys Win + E. The modifier GUI is what stands in for ...


4

Linux Getting Arduino and Arduino-like boards working properly under Linux can be a troublesome task if you are not familiar with how Linux works. So I am going to introduce you to some of the basic tools you will need to work out why your board isn’t working as you’d like it to work. The majority of problems a new user is faced with boil down to one ...


4

When using a cheap knockoff Nano, it seems that in the newer versions of the Arduino IDE (at least in 1.8.8), you may need to select "ATmega328P (Old bootloader)" from the Processor options under the Tools menu in order to upload sketches.


3

SMD soldering is not easy but here is the fix. Continuity achieved!


3

To convert my comments to an answer: You can use the register names directly. They are defined in the boards/chips core. To read them, simply use the names in your calculations. Write to the registers by setting the value of the registers name (like a variable: TCNT0 = 0;). Be sure to look into the datasheet, to check the behavior of that register.


3

The driver board for your "Lasersaur" appears to be based around the Adafruit Trinket Pro. That board, on Adafruit's website, is deprecated, with the following warning: Deprecation Warning: The Pro Trinket bit-bang USB technique it uses doesn't work as well as it did in 2014, many modern computers won't work well. So while we still carry the Pro Trinket ...


3

If you want to run the Arduino sketch on your desktop, you just have to implement the Arduino core library for your PC. It may not be as bad as it sounds. If your program makes only minimal use of the Arduino core, you may implement only the parts you really need. For example, this partial implementation is enough to run your program: #include <cstdint&...


2

Looking at the list of the HID keyboard codes (page 53), the keys you are looking for have a code of E3 (Keyboard Left GUI) or E7 (Keyboard Right GUI). Unluckily the Keyboard::press function (you can see it here) does not accept a so high value, since you can only input numbers between 0 and 255 and, in order to send a raw value, you have to send its value ...


2

I found the issue! There is a bug in the Arduino hardware: https://ketturi.kapsi.fi/2014/04/how-to-fix-moody-arduino-nano/ You need to bridge pins 25 and 26 of the FTDI chip (located at the back of the Arduino) to ground the pin 26 TEST signal. If I connect these pins then it works just fine!


2

Start | Control Panel | System | Device Manager | Ports (COM & LTP). Watch the list change as you plug / unplug the Arduino. The new port is the Arduino.


2

The Arduino.cc developers changed the bootloader on official Arduino Nanos to communicate at a different speed. Try setting Tools → Processor → ATmega328P (Old Bootloader)


2

Windows Ok, the first thing you need to do is identify the kind of board you have. I don't mean is it an Uno, a Mega, or one of Intel's brief forays into the Arduino world - I mean what kind of USB interface the board has. Boards can be loosely grouped into two categories - CDC/ACM and Custom USB Profile. Current versions of the official Arduino Uno and Mega ...


2

I've seen this error a few times and renaming the serial port fixed the problem in my case. I documented the steps in detail in Tip #4 of this blog post: https://gyorgybalassy.wordpress.com/2020/10/16/cant-open-device-com-access-is-denied-arduino-upload/


2

I haven't done it yet, but you could do the following things to get a somewhat close approximation: Make three different projects, one for the PC (only), e.g. Visual Studio, and one for Arduino (with the default Arduino IDE or e.g. Visual Micro). The last will be a generic library to be used for both the PC and Arduino. Use the Arduino specific libraries ...


2

You need a number of things to be true before the (new) bootloader will work: The hardware needs to be wired correctly You have used an appropriate crystal as the clock You have installed the correct bootloader (ie. one for the Atmega32U4) The fuses are set to boot into the bootloader The fuses are set for the correct bootloader size The fuses are set ...


2

Other than a software issue, there is no reason it shouldn't work. Only thing may be identical Bluetooth names or ids. Clear the device from windows and try again. I have some cheap Bluetooth obd 2 readers that all use the same Bluetooth mac address and name. I have to delete one from my android phone before adding the new one to connect to it.


2

With some Arduino boards, yes. You want a board like the Yun (unfortunately retired now, but there are probably others similar) which has a MIPS SoC on it that runs Linux (specifically OpenWRT). The OS is installed into the SoC, but there is an SD card slot that will allow you to read your code. An alternative is a Yun shield (available from third parties,...


1

Firstly, you have a clone not a genuine Arduino Nano. They use a different USB chip and require different drivers. Install the CH340 drivers. Secondly your cable is bad. It sounds like one with no data wires in it used for powering or charging small low-powered devices like bluetooth headsets etc. Replace the cable with a proper one.


1

What OS is running on two different devices exchanging messages/signals, does not matter. What matters is the protocol. You can use a lot of different ones: Wireless: IR (infrared) RF (radio), like 433 MHz, 2.4 GHz WIFI (internet) Bluetooth Wired SPI 'simple wires' / Wire library Serial USB (not on most Arduinos) This list is not complete, just some ...


1

You do not need to install drivers in Windows 10 (unless you have a CH340G based Chinese clone, in which case it wouldn't have detected before installing the drivers). Windows 10 has its own CDC/ACM drivers built in - something every other operating system has had for years and Windows has only just caught up with them. That is why it detected COM3 fine ...


1

After a couple of hours I figured out what was happening so I will write all my analysis here for anyone having some of my problems. First, a list of my components: -USB TTL ship, used to upload programs to Arduino Pro. The one on the picture on instructables dot com /id/Usb-to-SerialTTL-adapter/, and used that driver. -Arduino Pro. Chinese copy, red ...


1

@per1234 was correct: Note that the auto-reset is initiated when the computer opens the serial port at 1200 baud and then closes it From Arduino.cc In practise, this means that avrdude first has to be executed like so: $ avrdude -patmega32u4 -cavr109 -PCOM6 -b1200 Where COM6 is the same serial port the arduino is being displayed on in the Arduino IDE. ...


1

Its possible to do something similar, but you could reduce the cost even more and drop the Arduinos if you can get FreeRTOS to work on ESP-8266. These links gives you a brief guide to using the ESP8266 shield for serial over WIFI and how to program the ESP8266 directly. https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/esp8266-wifi-shield-hookup-guide https://learn....


1

Is it possible to get the same kind of serial communication over WIFI? Not precisely, no - but TCP sockets are a similar concept. You would be best programming the ESP8266 directly to implement a simple TCP to UART bridge firmware instead of fighting with the crummy AT firmware that comes with them.


1

No you cannot. Arduino communicates to pc via UART so there must be a host which can send or receive the data. You have to install software on the host computer which can send and receive data to the com port to which arduino is connected to.


1

Sorry for posting this as an answer, I don't have enough rep to write comments yet. 1) Have you tried different USB cables? A dodgy USB cable could power the Nano just fine, giving the impression that it's properly connected, without not actually supporting the data rate required for programming. The fact that something shows up on a USB port on your ...


1

Getting started with a new toolchain can be quite a challenge… I'm not a Windows guy, but it looks like there are drivers that need to be installed to get things working with the Arduino. I'm guessing that what is going on here is that Windows is looking locally for drivers and not finding them (or any indication that drivers are needed). I think the ...


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