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On a Unix shell, separating commands with the pipe character (|) means “run these commands in parallel, feeding the standard output of each one to the standard input of next one”. In this context, it makes no sense to use pipes, as both avr-objcopy and avrdude read their data from files, not from stdin. Furthermore, running these in parallel means that ...


5

First of all, if you want the Arduino to send data as a slave, it should do so onRequest(), not onReceive(). Thus: void setup() { Wire.begin(0x08); Wire.onRequest(handleRequest); } Next, as pointed out by chrisl in a comment, you should not delay within the onRequest handler. I would go further and say that you should not even call dht1....


5

I've come across this and this is how I worked around it (on Windows, but I suspect the problem and solution is the same). A brand new Pico or one not programmed by the Arduino IDE does not have a serial port, which is why you can't see one. Arduino sketches are compiled with a serial port automatically, so once a serial port exists, it can be used for ...


3

Official support. Apparently there's official support for it, now anyway. I was digging around in the Arduino-mbed core, trying to help someone else, specifically in the boards.txt and spied the line: pico.name=Raspberry Pi Pico Unfortunately, I don't have any way to give it a proper test as I don't have one of these. But I did go so far as to install the ...


3

Here is the library for the Arduino IDE and a Raspberry Pi pico. https://github.com/lrusak/Arduino-Core-Pico Just install normally as a .zip.


2

It is probably a non-existant or stale auth cookie in your .Xauthority file. This sort of thing happens when you're running your X session with one user but trying to run your X application as different user. Doing sudo or su root (or really any other user) is a common way to get in that situation. Running the IDE as root usually mean something else has ...


2

It is worth mentioning this excellent alternative to the Arduino one from Earle F. Philhower. It seems well-maintained and doesn't depend on Mbed OS, so it leaves more space (ram and flash) for your application. Here an informal comparative list.


2

They are defined by the compiler itself, and based on the name of the microcontroller passed to the compiler as (for AVR GCC) -mcpu=<mcu name>. You can list the defines for a version of GCC using (for example for AVR gcc): avr-gcc -mmcu=atmega328p -dM -E - < /dev/null Not sure what you'd use on Windows for /dev/null. Different target compilers use ...


1

As requested, I've collated my comments into an answer. How long are the cable runs? Is there any electrically noisy equipment near the cable runs? Consider using some form of galvanic isolation to interface the float sensors to the MCU. Texas Instruments has a great series of videos on the subject of galvanic isolation which discusses inductive, capacitive ...


1

Without the full codes, we can only guess. My guess would be the serial receive buffer on the Arduino is overflowing. One reason this could happen is if serialEvent() is not called frequently enough. This function is called by the Arduino core on every loop iteration, just after loop() returns. If your loop() takes too long (e.g. you are using delay() or ...


1

I don't know what the time.sleep(4) statement fixes, but you could try moving the to the top of the loop instead of the bottom, so it precedes the first read. At the bottom of the loop, it's first execution comes after the first read.


1

You might want to try sending the data in a packet delimited by unique characters, e.g. { and }, similar to the JSON format. The NMEA GPS standard uses $ and '\n' to delimit messages. Here is an Arduino non-blocking C++ algorithm which builds upon Majenko's readline() example to read a packet. It returns true when incoming data has been accumulated into a ...


1

What i2c clock speed are you using? Even at the faster "fairly standard" speed of 400kHz, that's 2.5us per bit. For a two byte transfer, that's 4us for the data alone, which is 25000 transfers per second. Add on the start and stop bits, plus processing time and you can see that your target data rate isn't possible. i2c just isn't that fast as ...


1

A RPI uses 3.3v logic while an arduino uses 5v logic you can use a logic converter but by now it's probly to late and maybe your arduino or RPI is broken (Sorry!)


1

What you are asking for is not completely trivial, and may be ill-suited for a beginner's project. You will have to create a protocol for the communication between the Raspberry Pi and the Arduino (your own “command language” of sorts), and then implement on the Arduino a command interpreter that understands this protocol and acts accordingly. I highly ...


1

A pushbutton is a pushbutton. It is a momentary switch. Since it has flexible wires, and needs a place to mount, you should probably wire it using a breadboard. That pushbutton looks like a panel mount pushbutton. You might want to mount it in a pice of plastic or sheet metal. (Unscrew that nut up by the red part that you press. Measure the outside diameter ...


1

One is a server and the other is a client. The server do not need to know IP of the client, but the client need to know IP address of the server. See more in communication between two Arduino


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Unfortunately, the L298N does not return a status, so you are going to have to add sensors to detect motor movement. Here are a few options you can try: Current sense. Add a small resistor to the output of the L298N and measure the voltage differential across that resistor. If there is current being supplied to the motor then you will have a voltage ...


1

For completeness, it appears an appropriate Python library can be installed with: pip3 install adafruit-circuitpython-ble The test code, used with the Arduino code 'Echo' from the ArduinoHardwareBLE library is below. This was updated to let you choose the name of the device (here, MY_BLE) rather than any random device that has UART capability. It also ...


1

All the grounds must be connected. They don't have to be the same physical pin - the Arduino has multiple GND pins, but they are all connected internally. The 5V doesn't matter where you get that from, as long as it's regulated and the associated ground is connected to all the others.


1

That motor driver has an optional on-board 5V regulator. It can be enabled / disabled with a jumper. With that regulator enabled you just need to connect a ground and your control signals (ENA/IN1/IN2 or ENB/IN3/IN4). If you disable that regulator (remove the jumper) then you need to provide power from the Arduino's 5V pin to the +5V screw terminal. The ENx ...


1

There are some good books available to help. There is the Raspberry Pi cookbook and the Arduino cookbook. These will take you from the very beginning to the point where you can make your own designs and they will work.


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