3

Using roundf() function: float rounded_temperature = roundf(temperature * 10) / 10;


3

Cool I got it using avrdude. $ avrdude -c arduino -P /dev/ttyUSB0 -b 9600 -p m328p -U flash:r:CNCArdunio.hex:i > -c the platform (basically) > -P the port where your harware is. > -b the baudrate. > -p the chip architecture. > -U momory type flash :r option to read to file :i option to format into Intel HEX. caveats.Upon closer inspection ...


2

There are a few issues at play here. One is that the Arduino resets every time you open the serial connection on the PC side. You can prevent this by putting a 1 µF (or more) capacitor between 5V and RESET. A second issue is that the tty driver may be keeping old data in its buffer, and you get this data when you open the connection. The third issue is that ...


1

A USB connection is actually very complex. And serial communications (or the CDC class of USB) is only 1 of over a dozen protocols used over USB. Most cheap embedded processors save money by leaving out this feature. Most Arduino's use cheap embedded processors. For instance, the classic Arduino Uno needs a second chip (search for New USB in this link) ...


1

On 8-bit Arduinos support for %f from printf and scanf (and related functions) has been removed to save space. Instead you should look at parsing the string into chunks with strtok() and use atof() to convert relevant chunks to floating point.


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I don't know what that code is, but it's not Arduino code. It looks like it's wrapped in some other class. But in real Arduino code... To "combine" your two button states it helps to think of them as two individual bits within a byte. A byte is made up of 8 bits, and any of them can be on or off. If you associate your two buttons with two of those ...


1

There is an issue with the way in which the data is sent and received because it assumes the transmission will remain perfectly synchronised for the lifetime of the programme. Consider what would happen if one byte were to be dropped due to a communication error – the x and y data would be swapped for further transmissions. Original Sender void loop() { // ...


1

I found the definitive answer to this. Start Arduino IDE To to File...Preferences... Turn on Show verbose output during: [X] upload (image 1 below) Upload a sketch to your Arduino Uno I used the sample blink sketch and saw the following (image 2 below): AVRDude: is used to upload You want that first line shown in white --- when you expand it you'll see ...


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