New answers tagged

2

The L293D has about a 2.6V drop on the output pins. That means for a 3V motor you need to provide about 5.6v for it to run at full speed. 5V will work, but it will run slightly slow and underpowered. 9V batteries are useless. Only any good for very low power applications like smoke alarms. They just can't provide the current you need. Instead you need to be ...


1

You could also use a 4 channel relay for making the motors work and they can be independent of using power from arduino and is really effective, I sometimes use it for high voltage optocoupling and can be used for small ones too all you need to do is build logic and everything would work fine I assume you know how to reverse polarity on a dc motor. Relays ...


1

You need to do math on the power consumption as arduino uno takes takes 5 V 500 mA at least for it to work. That is why it can be powered by USB cables too. Now if you try calculating power consumption on the motors you would understand that the power you are giving is nowhere enough for the arrangement to work or you could have been able to run the motors ...


1

Just a comment about your diagram. The two transistors should not share an Arduino pin in that way. If the pin is pulled high the transistors saturate and your current 'shoots through' from supply straight to ground. Instead assign one Arduino pin to each transistor (using the base resistor in your diagram).


1

DC motors are made for spinning. Trying to spin it in sub full revolution steps is not really possible. But you can use a geared DC motor, where the rotor after the gear is slow enough for your purpose. Also this can give you enough torque for moving the knob (since small DC motors are often rather weak by their own). You can find geared DC motors with many ...


Top 50 recent answers are included