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3

A reasonable estimate for current consumption of 5V NeoPixels is 60mA per pixel. For 186 pixels, that means about 11.16A at 5V; well over the 2.4A of the adapter being used for your other components. There exist modules called "DC-to-DC Buck Converters", which can step down the 12-14V of your automobile to pretty much any voltage under the input voltage. To ...


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I looked for information about it in the documentation, but I couldn't find it. Well, some of their documentation says: The TWAI controller’s interface consists of 4 signal lines known as TX, RX, BUS-OFF, and CLKOUT. These four signal lines can be routed through the GPIO Matrix to the ESP32’s GPIO pads. And that sort of seems to be backed up by their ...


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SPI pins are located on different pins in Arduino Mega. You have to wire it correctly with your shield. Some shields uses ICSP (6-pin header) for better compatibility but this one doesn't. See Arduino SPI Reference for more details (section: Connections)


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I ended finding a Arduino library called Spritz which can be found here: https://github.com/abderraouf-adjal/ArduinoSpritzCipher Also, for anyone else who comes across this task, here is a very simple Hashed Message Authentication Code (HMAC) example I scrapped together: https://github.com/zach-king/ArduinoStash/blob/master/src/Spritz_HMAC/Spritz_HMAC.ino ...


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Beware, the industry standard pinout for CAN on DB9 connectors is different to what Sparkfun use on their shield: pin 3/5 CAN bus shield schematic pin 2/7 (Vector tools for example). Which software have you been using on the Arduino? Any additional info on the ECU you're using, and the wiring in your system?


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In SPI protocol you'll need to read the SPI buffer twice because the data you wrote will be read by the IC and the IC will respond to it in the next communication and that's when you know. Also, by looking at the message, I see that your IC is working fine, but is your CAN bus initialised properly? I'm a FSAE team member and I've faced this issue with the ...


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Technically, yes: If you hook up this shield to the car buses through OBD-II, and know which messages to send (e.g., ones that the car will accept and work with), then it will work. The problem is: There are some "official" messages, basically emission related stuff, that are mandatory on every cars. There are lists of these out there. Unfortunately, most ...


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Yes. Normally you would write a linux kernel driver to communicate with your device (arduino) following your own protocol, but SocketCAN provides by default a way to interface with Lawicel dongles, whose communication protocol is publicly available: CANUSB / CAN232 protocol. Many people have built arduino sketches that implement this protocol so you can use ...


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You will have to play some games to make it work. CAN is a bus with dominate and recessive states. This is how it arbitrates. When a unit starts sending a message and another starts concurrently they will both keep transmitting until one is sending a dominate signal and the other is recessive. At that point the unit placing the recessive signal on the ...


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It may be a dumb question, but are you sure your car CAN bus is 500kbps? Have a look at this: pdfLink Maybe try different speeds? 100kbps maybe? Also, look at the schematics of your shield? Is the bus termination resistor soldered on the board?


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What model car do you have? Most cars do not have the ability to control power windows from the car computer. Late model cars will have the ability to control the window motors using bidirectional functions on a scan tool. On any car, the window motors have two wires, if one wire is given power and one ground it will spin if you switch the wire that gets ...


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No, it's not a mistake. It's related to this statement on their Wiki: When you use more than two CAN Bus Shield in one net, you should take the impedance into consideration. You should either cut P1 in the PCB with a knife, or just remove R3 on the PCB. If you look closely at the pads of P1 you will see a small trace joining them together. That is the "...


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tCAN will be a struct that defines the structure of the CAN message being sent. The name tCAN is not a standard and will have been chosen by the author of the library you are using. At a guess it's using a variant of Hungarian Notation, and the t prefix means type - so it's probably been typedef'd from a struct to a type name. I am not familiar with CAN, ...


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Many options come to mind: Bluepill board Literally any board with I2C and CAN buses from the STM32 series, as searchable on their website (https://my.st.com/content/my_st_com/en/products/microcontrollers.html) ESP32 A Bluebill board is programmable with mbed, STM32HAL (CubeMX) and Arduino, all of which have either CAN libraries for the CAN peripheral or ...


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tCAN here is a struct that defines a CAN frame to be sent over the network. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/CAN_bus#Frames There are several types of frames, standard, extended, and FD (flexible data). The tables in the linked Wikipedia article describe the physical protocol. The struct won’t have a corresponding field for every section of the protocol, ...


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Just spotted this, but if any one else finds it: You have one CAN speed set to 125kb on MCP2515 the other to 100kb on the VP230. That's why you won't get anything! Mark


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Just guessing but looks to me like you read the CAN message and print it character by character to the Serial console but you don't save those characters in a buffer as you get them from CAN.read(). So when you then try to display.print((char)CAN.read()); at that point there are no more characters to available for the CAN.read() to read so nothing is printed ...


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I have a lengthy reference question about SPI which may help you. To transfer outwards you do not need to use an interrupt. Nor is it polled. The data is simply placed in the SPI register and the hardware clocks the data out at the defined SPI rate. To transfer inwards you are just reading the register. However to know when you need to read it, you would ...


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Despite the "the library example must be correct, It's work for other people before you", I'm not sure a lot of people make it works. I've seen that even when the mcp2551 don't receive anything on can bus, the SPI bus is saturated by the mcp2551. The solution was to use a simplest library make for 8MHz cristal chip. Modify it to works with standard ...


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Each port on the ATmega328P (or the ATmega8 for that matter) is controlled by two registers¹: DDRx, where x is B, C or D, is the “data direction register”. It is used to set the pin to either input or output. Writing to this register is roughly equivalent to calling pinMode(). PORTx is the port's “data register”. It is mostly used in output mode to set the ...


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First off I cannot say much about the library that you are using I have't tried that one yet as for the shield i have some of those and there are two versions of them check your PIN outs on them the cs pin is either on d9 or d10 the other thing is make sure that you are in the right operation mode ie. Normal and maybe give this library a try I have had lots ...


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There are indeed a few coding issues in your sketch, especially in the receiver part. I will try to list them and suggest changes. If you look closely to your received data, you will see that AccX==GyY and AccY==GyZ on every line of your output. This is because you use the global variable rxBuf1 in your byte2Int and byte2Double functions on the receiver ...


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DISCLAIMER: Ok, I never worked with CAN on arduino, so I may be terribly wrong, nor I have the required boards to test this, so I may make a lot of errors; if you find any issue, please point them out, so I can fix them (or if you fixed them notify me, so I can update the reply for the future readers). Ok, from what I can read you are have two packets, but ...


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Transmitting this "wake signal" does not "wake" the transceiver. What it's actually doing is the transceiver, when in "standby" mode, only allows through signals that have a dominant or recessive state that is longer than the filter time (5.5µs). Any transitions in the bus after a stable period of 5.5µs or more will get passed through. The transceiver does ...


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Yes, it is possible. CAN is a multi-master serial bus standard for connecting Electronic Control Units [ECUs] also known as nodes. Two or more nodes are required on the CAN network to communicate. The complexity of the node can range from a simple I/O device up to an embedded computer with a CAN interface and sophisticated software. -- Wikipedia You ...


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Connect both of your appliances i.e AC and Humidifier to 2 different relays. Connect the relays to the Arduino Uno digital I/O pin using a small current amplifier circuit or a Darlington Transistor pair that will amplify the current going to the relay. Relay circuit Darlington Pair Now the connection of your sensor with arduino. In your code you have to ...


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You should use two relays to operate the two devices. You would have been able to use one relay, if you would have one device ON or OFF by default. For the relays use separate I/O pins declared as OUTPUT and have some circuitry for Arduino output current to be amplified, before the relays and after the I/O pins.


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There's a hardware conflict between these two boards which seems to not be resolvable. The solution was to buy the Keyes USB shield, make sure only it has access to pins 9 and 10 from the Arduino and then wire pin 7 (or 8) into pin 9 of the CAN shield, while also properly initializing the CAN shield with that new pin. Lastly, the Keyes USB shield's ICSP ...


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@Paul, thanks for your suggestion. I want to go forward with TCP/IP. I have now setup a ESP8266 Modul. The ESP Modul is setup as a Server. The Server on the ESP Modul is up and running. I'm also able to connect to the ESP-server with "Hercules", a Terminal Tool. All the example I found were establishing communicating with Browser and HTML. I have ...


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