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It is likely not a question of the voltage being "big enough". You do need to feed the correct voltage to your robot, but max current and capacity are also very important. Those "9V transistor batteries" have very low peak current and very low total power capacity (measured in milliamp-hours, or mAh.) They are not up to the job of ...


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That motor driver has an optional on-board 5V regulator. It can be enabled / disabled with a jumper. With that regulator enabled you just need to connect a ground and your control signals (ENA/IN1/IN2 or ENB/IN3/IN4). If you disable that regulator (remove the jumper) then you need to provide power from the Arduino's 5V pin to the +5V screw terminal. The ENx ...


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Wiring 6 batteries up so it gives you both a stack of 3 and a stack of 4 is not easy, and although you can do it you shouldn't do it. The only arrangement is this: simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab (The grey link is optional and makes little difference if it's there or not). The reason you shouldn't really do that arrangement ...


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Yes, this is perfectly possible. You will need to write a routine that you can trigger via Serial. For example you will listen on Serial until you get the dump command. Then run a function that spits your variables out to Serial. You just have to be careful where you save your 5 variables. If stored in memory (RAM), you should avoid power loss. Therefore I'd ...


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9v batteries are incapable of supplying enough current for a motor; their best application is tiny-current, standby devices like smoke detectors. You need a power supply that can deliver much more current than the 9v brick can. 6 AA cells in series would do much better. 6 pairs of AA-cells would give you longer run time (each 2 cells in parallel; the 6 ...


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In my opinion it is NOT SAFE, if your 18650 Battery Shield also charges the battery. Anyhow some pages state that it is possible to charge LiFePo4 batteries with 4.2V instead of the recommended 3.65V. https://www.powerstream.com/lithium-phosphate-charge-voltage.htm LiFePo4 batteries have a smaller energy density and therefore capacity. Thus those are not as ...


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No. Absolutely not. A LiFePO4 battery is 4.2V when fully charged. The absolute maximum voltage of an ESP32 is 3.6V. You will kill the ESP32. Instead you need to have a voltage regulator with a very low dropout. Ideally a switching ("buck") regulator with a zero-dropout "pass" mode to give the maximum life from your battery. Even better is ...


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I give you credit for trying. In your spare time read some materials on basic electronics. I will see if I can help but no guarantee. he motor driver you are using has transistors as the driving element. That indicates the motor power is going through them. Since they are transistors they have a PN junction. When voltage goes through a silicone junction it ...


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A power supply a 9V battery is not. Since you are using batteries the L293D is a very poor choice for a driver, it uses silicon transistors which I believe are in a darlington configuration which will cause a voltage drop of from 1.4 to 2.8 volt on the motor. The 4 (or more) AA batteries will work but use a MOSFET bridge. You can always use a small SEPIC (...


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Rule #1 9V batteries a power supply they are NOT. In your case you are looking at small voltages for the motor power. Your choice of a driver is not the best as you will have from 1.2 to 2.4 volts across the L298 depending on the loading. This is directly from the ST data sheet. Try the TB6612FNG instead, taking advantage of the device’s use of MOSFETs. The ...


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