4

As Majenko already mention, use a separate power supply. Use that power to power the LED strip(s). Use the MCU to control the data and clock lines. Connect grounds together.


3

It means the pin can be a PWM output for use with analogWrite().


3

Managing your power budget is a normal part of electronics projects. You can only draw about 500 mA total from the USB port, and less than that from the 5V line if your Arduino is powered from USB. If you drive your Arduino with ≈7V into the barrel connector you might be able to pull a full amp from the 5V rail, but it depends on how hot the voltage ...


2

Uno's Mega's and so on have a separate MCU (u3) that contains the boot loader and is responsible for the USB connection and for driving the virtual serial port. Micros ( and also Leonardos and Esploras ) have built in USB support in the main MCU (u4). So if your program does something that breaks the USB part of the MCU the communication breaks also. This ...


2

This is likely a permission problem. The user likely does not have permission to read from and write to the port created when plugging in the Arduino. This can be temporally fixed using the following command: sudo chmod 666 /dev/ttyACM0 However, this procedure is only temporary as the port is recreated every time the Arduino is reconnected to the ...


2

So am I right in this assumption? Yep. and If so, what can I do to increase the amount of pixels I can power at full range? Simple: don't power it from the Arduino. Add a proper external power supply that is capable of providing the current you require.


1

The wireless medium you choose is largely irrelevant. The important thing to realise is that it's not (in most cases) the wireless medium that is communicating with the computer. Most wireless mice use the nRF24L01+ (or rather the integrated SoC equivalent) to communicate. They use a USB dongle plugged into the computer for that communication. The computer ...


1

Your problem is most likely the use of SoftwareSerial for your VR module communication. SoftwareSerial is notorious for breaking things. It disables interrupts, and hogs the CPU. You should be using the hardware serial port instead which, on the Pro Mini, is completely separate to USB communication.


1

You can read the Arduino's supply voltage see here How to measure the supply voltage of Arduino without using an analog pin Alternatively use the internal 1.1V reference and a suitable voltage divider to read the lipo's voltage


1

You mustn't terminate a #define with a ;. Semicolons are for C and C++ statements. #define is a preprocessor statement. #define creates a literal string replacement, so when you use it you end up with: const char keymap[5;][6;] = {... which is, of course, wrong.


1

You need to add an external 3.3V voltage regulator. You can get these quite cheap on eBay (etc) as a module - some even come in a breadboard friendly format. Power it from the 5V from the Arduino, then power your MAX4466. However, the MAX4466 can run at up to 5.5V, so I fail to see why you think you need 3.3V.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible