16

You appear to have a "pro micro" style board in which the USB communication is directly sourced from the main ATmega32u4 processor, rather than generated as serial data and then forwarded to a distinct USB-serial converter as on traditional Arduinos. Your question could have been resolved much more quickly if you had clearly stated the type of board you ...


10

It is more the differences between ATMega328P + FTDI (Pro Mini) vs ATMega32u4 (Pro Micro) Apart from the minor pin differences, the peripherals for both MCUs are the same. The major difference is the ATMega32u4 has built in full-speed USB. This allows the board to function as a USB device by implementing the appropriate USB stack. E.g. it can act as a USB ...


7

1) have i got an out of date bootloader? No. This has nothing to do with the bootloader. 2) if so how do i check? See above. 3) is this intended behavior and if so why? In a manner of speaking, yes - see below. 4) is this a bug in the arduino bootloader or libraries? No. Elsewhere. See below. 5) short of having to change my code to look for ...


5

The bluetooth board uses 3.3V, not 5V according the datasheet. So you'll need to shift the voltage level between it and the Arduino board (which is 5V). Note that the spec sheet shows how this can easily be done with 2 resistors (R1 and R2 in sheet typical application circuit, page 5). Also, on the bluetooth module, the RS232 interface has 4 pins: UART_TX ...


5

The earth's magnetic field is not parallel with the ground. In some locations it can be pointing more down than across. NOAA has a magnetic field calculator where you can enter you latitude and longitude. For example, I am located at approx 19deg S 147degE and the field is North Comp East Comp Vertical Comp Total magnitude 32,434.4 nT 4,280.6 ...


5

First you should consider changing your whole idea so that your LEDs don't draw nearly 10A. I am assuming that for each segment you have 14-20 LEDs wired in parallel, each with its own current limiting resistor. That is very wasteful. Instead you should be grouping the LEDs in chains of series LEDs which you then place in parallel. Assuming you have ...


4

It's in the notes in section 29.2: Although each I/O port can sink more than the test conditions (20mA at VCC = 5V, 10mA at VCC = 3V) under steady state conditions (non-transient), the following must be observed: ATmega16U4/ATmega32U4: 1.)The sum of all IOL, for ports A0-A7, G2, C4-C7 should not exceed 100 mA. 2.)The sum of all IOL, for ports ...


4

Sounds like you have guessed it: although it's very hard to say from those photos, it doesn't look like you have the circuit grounded. Connect a ground from the Arduino to the black wire from the battery.


4

As Majenko already mention, use a separate power supply. Use that power to power the LED strip(s). Use the MCU to control the data and clock lines. Connect grounds together.


3

I'm unable to provide a complete answer yet but my research so far into a similar quest to use a similar remote can at least answer why you are getting two values for the same button on the remote. This is by design: the Nokia-32 RCMM protocol of this remote uses toggling codes that flip between one value and another on alternating presses of the same button....


3

I've got an idea. Your board isn't being recognized. Try unplugging the arduino and see if Com 1 is still there. Sometimes it can recognize mice and other devices as Com 1 or 2 instead of your arduino. On some of my development machines after everything settled out my devices will show up on Com 4 and 5 when I am working on two at a time. If this is not ...


3

What happened was the ignition caused massive spikes on the 12V power. You require an automotive grade regulator that can cope with spikes in excess of around 70V or more. Your best bet is probably a car USB charger adapter since they are cheap and easy to get hold of.


3

Assuming you have the Pro Micro core, they are called A0, A1, A2, A3, A6, A7, A8, A9 and A10. There is no need to "special case" the others, since the pins are known as both.


3

So I stumbled upon this thread while having similar problem, but with HC-05 module. So because I have too much free time on my hands during finals (no I don't) I decided to create a small github repo that might help someone sometime. https://github.com/Sackhorn/HC-05-Pro-Micro-Hookup The code is: //Writen for pro micro //These proved to be usefull //...


3

Just hook up the serial pins from the bluetooth module to the corresponding Pro Micro pins: TX to RX and RX to TX. I hope this can help someone. Then look for data like this: void setup(){ Serial1.begin(9600); // Init Hardware Serial port on pins 0 and 1 - Bluetooth Serial.begin(9600); // Init Virtual Serial Port - Machine Keyboard.begin(); // ...


3

According to http://arduino.cc/en/pmwiki.php?n=Reference/BooleanVariables, "Each boolean variable occupies one byte of memory." Meaning you are trying to use 4032 Bytes of RAM with your array which I assume you do not have (whatever this unofficial Arduino is -- it's likely to be less than that: the ATmega328 of the Arduino Mini has 2 kB of SRAM, the ...


3

Because the SD card is an SPI device it shares the same pins as the ISP interface. The only way to not have the SD card interfere with the ISP is to not have the SD card connected. As you have seen, that can be achieved by removing the card. It can also be achieved by adding a tri-state buffer between the MCU and the card so the MCU only connects the card ...


3

No, you cannot - the ATmega's ADC is referenced to its ground, and there are also some strict limits on providing inputs more than a little bit outside of the range between its power and ground. You may be able to read two analog inputs and subtract them for a sort of "software differential" analog input, but the signal on an LED is unlikely to be ...


3

If you amplified with an op-amp powered by 5V then it couldn't produce more than 5V output, so that could be your solution. Failing that, I think a resistor and a couple of clamping diodes would help. The resistor is to current-limit the clamping diodes. I don't think you need to worry about dropping the voltage through the resistor because the analog input ...


3

Some important facts: The 32U4 cannot act as a USB master, only a USB device (it doesn't have a USB OTG interface). The USB shield is an SPI based device. It can communicate with any host MCU that can use SPI, as long as you can wire it in properly. The Arduino doesn't have the processing power or memory to deal with the sheer onslaught of data a USB camera ...


3

That library relies mostly on Timer 1 and, as you already noticed, the Timer 1 of the ATmega32U4 is very similar, if not identical, to the one of the 328P. At least similar enough to expect the library to work identically. I took a look at both datasheets and the only difference I can see that can possibly affect the library is the pinout. The ...


3

You're making it too hard on yourself. There is a method to re-start the USB, but it only works if the USB has been properly stopped - and the method that is supposed to do that is empty. This is a little sketch that works on my Leonardo: #include <LowPower.h> void setup() { } void loop() { USBCON = 0; LowPower.powerDown(SLEEP_8S, ...


3

Kind of. You don't have to change pins_arduino.h. Try the LED_BUILTIN_TX and the LED_BUILTIN_RX. The pins are turned on and off by the code for the SerialUSB port. That can not be changed without changing the Arduino libraries. Setting that pin to INPUT in your sketch in the setup() function will turn them off: pinMode(LED_BUILTIN_TX,INPUT); pinMode(...


3

Managing your power budget is a normal part of electronics projects. You can only draw about 500 mA total from the USB port, and less than that from the 5V line if your Arduino is powered from USB. If you drive your Arduino with ≈7V into the barrel connector you might be able to pull a full amp from the 5V rail, but it depends on how hot the voltage ...


2

If your pro micro does not have a reset button, wire one between reset and ground. Press reset twice, quickly, and immediately hit upload on the IDE. Secondly, make sure you've downloaded and installed the Sparkfun board files for the pro micro.


2

You can simply make a google search; Here is some code to get you started // Declaration of variables #define Step 7 // Pin that transmits the "step" order to the board #define Dir 6 // Pin that indicates the direction of the rotation int vit = 10 ; // Speed of the rotation (smaller means faster rotation) int sens = 1 ; // Rotation ...


2

You have to do some tweaks to the usbkeyboard libraries that comes with the IDE. For a video tutorial, take a look at this: Arduino Leonardo as a multimedia keyboard Which uses the information from this site, if you prefer text only: Arduino Leonardo multimedia keys The Leonardo and ProMicro both use the ATMega32u4 and should both work with theses ...


2

The link you provided shows a board built around the ATmega32U4. On this chip, “__vector_32” is the low-level name of an ISR (Interrupt Service Routine) named “TIMER3_COMPA_vect”. Your problem comes from having two libraries trying to define an ISR for the same interrupt, which is generated by the timer 3 of the chip. Merging the ISRs is actually ...


2

The problem you're seeing arises when two codes (e.g. libraries) try to use the same interrupt. If you look at the source code of the two libraries, you'll find that they both make use of a number of ISRs (interrupt service routines): Tone.cpp uses ISR(TIMERn_COMPA_vect) {...} for n = 0..5, while Servo.cpp uses ISR(TIMERn_COMPA_vect) {...} for n = 1, 3,...


2

Well, if each boolean takes a full byte, as fuenfundachtzig says, then you might try some bitwise hacking to fit 8 bools per byte on your own. Maybe something like this: unsigned int16 buffer[84][3]; //16 bits * 3 = 48 bits, per the original example void init_buffer() { for(int i = 0; i < 84; i++) { for(int j = 0; j < 3; j++) ...


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