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0

I found a new possible solution to this problem, as I spent 2 days to solve it, I feel that I need to share it with you guys. I also could find the sensor through i2C scanner, but could not initialize it. Here is the summary of solutions: Powering problem 1: add a 50ms delay in the setup function (before the sensor init, obviously). This way, the Vin will ...


0

Alright. After reading some and some more, I was able to notice that SCK, just one pin down from AVCC, was the missing link. Yet another reminder to properly read the fabulous manual. It looks so easy now.


3

You could use an internal timer. You are using interrupts, and you are probably aware that interrupt handling inevitably incurs some jitter. Thus, if you do not mind an extra single CPU cycle of jitter, you could reconfigure the timer on each interrupt in order to control the average interrupt period. Here is how I would do it, with Timer 1 running in normal ...


1

It seems that everything is working as it should and the computer and the board can see each other. The only thing left to do is to select the board type so the IDE knows how to send the code in a way that the board can interpret. Select Tools > Board > Arduino AVR Boards > Arduino Nano. If you have an old or non-Arduino board, try the old ...


1

To convert the comments into an answer: You cannot (!) use the Keyboard library on the Arduino Uno/Nano/Mini. It needs a native USB interface to configure it as a HID device, but the Uno/Nano/Mini all use the Atmega328p, which doesn't have a native USB interface. These Arduinos use an additional chip on the board which acts as USB-UART-bridge. You can ...


-1

I was getting the same error when I got my brand new Nano Every. I had Registers emulation: ATMEGA328 I changed it to None (ATMEGA4809) and it uploaded without problems. I'm on ubuntu 18.04, and this is after the IDE prompted me to install the megaAVR boards library (1.8.7) of course.


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According to my calculations, building a voltage divider that turns 12 to 7 volts with a maximum intensity of 41 mA (which should be enough to power the arduino under normal circumstances) requires a resistor R1 of 43 ohms and R2 of 30 ohms, where R1 and R2 would be connected in series from Vin (12V) to ground, and your arduino's Vin pin connected between R1 ...


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