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1

You can select "randomly" from your array of quotes by using the random() function to generate an index into the array. One way to send a quote from your phone would be to create a web-page on your Nano to receive the quote. This is a rather more complex project than displaying a random quote so you should plan to get random display working first. ...


2

There are two problems here - one immediate and one which will be come apparent. First off, you appear not to have connected the ground pins of the two boards together. This is important. Voltage is not an absolute value, it's a value relative to some other point in the circuit. This is why "voltage" is sometimes called "potential difference&...


3

USB doesn't have data and clock lines. It has a pair of data lines with inverted polarity (D+ and D-). The USB protocol is considerably more complex than you seem to imagine. However there is a caveat: some keyboards have the ability to work in IBM PS/2 mode. For this you will need a USB to PS/2 adaptor (pictured below) and then use the PS2Keyboard.h library....


1

Note that in your case, the width of the input range (1023) is only very slightly larger than the width of the output range (1000). You could take this width difference (23) as the dead zone, and this would simplify the arithmetics: now the linear parts of your map have a slope of exactly 1, and you do not need multiplications or divisions. The map is then: ...


1

Here's how to create the new mapped range with a dead zone. I used Servo.write() which specifies the position in degrees because I couldn't understand what microsecond timings you need, but it should be easy to change it back. I've also added some debug statements to print val as the joystick is moved. #include <Servo.h> // Constants for servo angles ...


0

In general, Windows assigns COM ports to USB devices when they are plugged in the first time. If you have multiple USB sockets, the same physical device will be assigned a different COM port when plugged into different sockets. Is it possible that you have changed your setup and are now using a different USB socket? Try the others to see if that works.


0

If for IA you mean just decisions based on some inputs (sensors), yes. The main problem on that kind of applications is the memory. The Arduino has a limited quantity of flash and Ram. Really limited. A way to improve it, is to have a Web server and use the Arduino to send the data to your server over a WiFi module. As said, the only limit on Arduino is the ...


1

In device manager, right click on the device and select "Properties". Then go to the tab "Connection properties" and click on "Advanced". There you can change the COM port number assignment for a particular device.


0

My method is to separate the direction from the magnitude: Subtract the "center" value to create a ± range Use the sign to indicate the direction Take the abs to give the magnitude Subtract the "threshold" value If negative set to zero So, with example values: int val = analogRead(0); // Raw value val -= 512; ...


2

The L293D has about a 2.6V drop on the output pins. That means for a 3V motor you need to provide about 5.6v for it to run at full speed. 5V will work, but it will run slightly slow and underpowered. 9V batteries are useless. Only any good for very low power applications like smoke alarms. They just can't provide the current you need. Instead you need to be ...


1

You could also use a 4 channel relay for making the motors work and they can be independent of using power from arduino and is really effective, I sometimes use it for high voltage optocoupling and can be used for small ones too all you need to do is build logic and everything would work fine I assume you know how to reverse polarity on a dc motor. Relays ...


1

timestamp in rtcReadTime() is a local variable. When you return from that function it ceases to exist - so what you have returned is nothing. You can't print nothing, so the Arduino crashes. You either need to make the timestamp variable static so that it's not lost when you leave the function, make it a global variable, which has a similar effect, or pass a ...


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There's a few similar projects already done on YouTube, which you can use for guidance. If this is your 1st project using arduino I would recommend the Uno as is the easiest to work with. As you become more familiar with microcontrollers you can easily switch to the nano. As for what sensors you decide to use is up to you. You have quite a bit of flexibility....


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@starcat, regular usb cable for powering arduino


1

If you want a quick, cheap, and easy solution, you could just use sleep() in your Python script to put a delay between the commands. This obviously isn't a perfect solution, but it's not difficult to implement. Or, like you said, you could use a delimiter. It's not as easy to implement, but it'll work better. If you go the delimiter rout, you'll probably ...


1

The Arduino UNO WiFi Rev2 defaults to an internal analog reference of 0.55V where the classic (non-"Every") Nano defaults to the external VCC voltage as a reference, which is usually around 5V, often a little lower because of the diode it uses between USB and "5V". Either you need to be using the same voltage reference by selecting a ...


3

It would be great if I could set up an interrupt to turn on an LED when the batteries were getting weak That won't work. The thresholds for the pin registering LOW or HIGH depend on the supply voltage. Very roughly: a pin in guaranteed to register LOW if its voltage is below ⅓ Vcc it is guaranteed to register HIGH if it's above ⅔ Vcc nothing is guaranteed ...


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