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A motor driver is a chip that drives motors. A motor shield is a circuit board with connections on it that contains a motor driver chip that drives motors. A shield is convenient since you can just plug it in to your Arduino and wire the motors direct to it, but it lacks the flexibility of a raw driver chip which you can wire up precisely as your project ...


5

Here is a link to a robotoid page which describes a way to use it. Here is a link to funnyrobotics which explains how to use it. I am confident that you could use a search engine to find more examples. One trick is to use image search. Then look for pictures which look like your photo, and which have extra writing on them. Most people who add labels and ...


4

If I were a beginner, I'd go with the Motor shield. I'm even personaly using the one from DfRobot, which as @Gerben said, is just plug and play. It also allows you to select the input power for the motors, which can be either from the 5V Arduino pin or from an external battery. This is pretty convenient if you need more than 5V to power up your motors. It ...


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No, it doesn't look like it. The LCD board uses digital pins 4-10 and analog 0 The motor board uses digital pins 3-12 if all motors are used. If you need to stack boards look for boards that use I2C since they can share a single data bus.


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Since there are two grounds, a 2-pin terminal block of the type already on the board may fit. Or, since the shield doesn't obscure the far end of the Mega (the end with the high numbered I/Os), you could pick up 5V and Gnd there. The ends of the double-row female header have respectively, 2 each 5V and Gnd connectors. You would pick those up with breadboard ...


4

No. The continuous rotation servo rotates continuously and you can not control where to stop. You can control the rotation direction and the speed at a little. What you need is either a special 270 degree servo, or you can use some mechanic, e.g. gears to transform the 0..180 rotation to 0..whateverrotation you prefer, depending on the gearbox ratio. ...


4

It's perfectly doable. As Chris Stratton puts it, it's all about implementing non-blocking serial communication: whenever you receive a character, you store it in a buffer whenever you have a complete command in the buffer, you process it and reset the buffer For a line-oriented protocol, it may look something like: /* Process incoming characters if any. *...


4

First you have to compare the pinouts of the two shields. If the shields use completely different pins then yes, you can use them together. However if they share pins then you need to look in more detail at what those pins are and how they are being used. In your example you have SPI being used (pins 10-13) for one shield and PWM (3/11) and GPIO (8/9/12/13)...


4

According to tutorial, the shield uses almost all D pins. Free are pins 2 and 13. If servo is not used the pins 9 and 10 are free too. The pin 2 has the extra hole to solder a wire or a single pin header. All analog pins are free and the shield enables to solder headers for them with additional header rows for 5V and ground for every A pin. You can use ...


3

The Motor Shield 2A plugs in on top of the Arduino Uno, and the LCD Keypad plugs in on top of the motor shield. [But see Edit 1 below] There is better information about the 4 Channel Line Tracking Sensor at uctronics.com where you can see that its main board (with the LM339 chip) connects to the Arduino via six lines: Vcc, Gnd, Out1, Out2, Out3, Out4. ...


3

On the Motor shield the servo headers are directly connected to pins 9 and 10 (I think 9 is servo 2 and 10 is servo 1). So you can use the standard servo examples using pins 9 and 10. If you need to power the servos with an external power supply you must cut a trace on the back of the board -- the silk screen tells you where to cut. Then you need to ...


3

What is: // Random action int i = (1, 101); supposed to achieve? /tmp/untitled1/untitled1.ino: In function 'void loop()': /tmp/untitled1/untitled1.ino:110:13: warning: left operand of comma operator has no effect [-Wunused-value] Ergo, i is always going to be 101. So all the if constructs will be false, so they get optimized out (they are all constants)....


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Per the comments above, and the documentation from Adafruit, a 9V battery is insufficient for use with motors as they do not provide enough current.


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A couple of things I see... 1.) Your motor leads may be shorting out of the housing of the motor. make sure they are not. 2.) You may have the motor on the wrong port for the given code: On line 7 of the code it reads: AF_DCMotor motor(4); So try switching physically your motor to port 4. 3.) Also, this board has an I2C address and I dont see that ...


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It would be more accurate to say that it can be used as part of a microstepping system, though it's probably not a good choice for any use today. The L293D is merely an (effectively obsolete implementation of an) H-bridge, not a stepper motor sequencer, hence it is no more capable of autonomously driving a motor in full or half step mode than it is of ...


3

In my case, when I was running my DC motors at full load, I noticed a large voltage drop in the circuit. This could affect the signals or transmission of data on the Arduino. It is definitely recommended to power the arduino and motor shield with separate power source. Make sure the the share a common GND.


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Based on this thread: https://forums.adafruit.com/viewtopic.php?f=31&t=27069 https://stackoverflow.com/questions/18705363/arduino-uno-pwm-pins-conflict http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=97133.0 Both AFmotor library and IRremote are using timer feature. And in addition, IRremote also use TIMER_RESET, which probably causing the motor not ...


3

You should do you own research as the path followed here did not result in the identically pictured nor identically model numbered item. You indicated you are using a certain Arduino motor driver board. On that page there is an "made by" or "by" reference to an OEM. On the OEM's web page there is a "Dual Bipolar Stepper Motor Shield for Arduino" but the ...


3

You should not power a motor from a micro-controller, period, regardless if that is an ATmega or an ESP32. Instead, you need to use a motor driver circuit - this isn't really so much about voltage amplification, as it is about current amplification. The actual I/O output voltage of your ESP32 is likely very close to 3.3v. If you are measuring 1.8v, that is ...


3

You do need the ground wire. The reason it 'works' without it is that enable input effectively then has an aerial connected and is responding in the same was as if you touch the input jack on an amplifier and hear a buzzing sound. There is a link behind the blue connectors that enables the onboard 5v regulator. I assume you have this fitted, or it wouldn't ...


3

As noted by markshancock, you are using an older version of the Adrafruit Motor Shield library meant for the version 1 of the board (you have the version 2.3), and according to their forum they are not compatible (they use different communication protocols) use the newer version of the library https://forums.adafruit.com/viewtopic.php?f=31&p=276888


2

Here's what I've found about both the motor shield and the motors: Motors are 3-6V and will use a lot of amperage. This may be a problem with a mobile robot. You'll have to figure out a power source that can provide 4+ amps... on battery power that's a lot. Personally, I would go with a continuous rotation servo for a compact, light robot. Motor sheild can ...


2

This is the core of embedded design and "hacking" and highlights one of my peeves about Arduino design: too much focus on the pin numbers and physical location on the PCBs, rather than the actual functions on those pins. So? Physically move the pins on the Motor Shield. Here are 3 options in order of the most hack-ish to most-clean: 1) Use an edge cutter ...


2

the Vin pin on the Arduino is the source to the internal voltage regulator. It needs about 7 volts in order to work. If you try to feed 5V into the Vin then the Arduino won't get a full 5V. Motors draw a lot of current, and cause transients on the power line as they switch on and off. (They will cause transients even in a regulated supply, because it takes ...


2

The external power of the shield is connected to the VIN pin, so it will power the Arduino via that. (vin goes to the voltage regulator that will provide the 5v the arduino needs). You can connect two batteries in parallel to provide mode current. But since they are 12v motors, they would need 12v to run at maximum power. 9v is a lot less than that.


2

I think you may be having an issue with how you are powering the shield. Are you trying to do it with just your USB connection? In your photo, I do not see a connection to your Arduino's barrel jack or to the Vin connector of the shield itself. According to the SparkFun site: The Ardumoto Shield should be powered through one of two power supply inputs. ...


2

Using a motor controller to power an Arduino or analog peripherals is probably unwise as the source is liable to be noisy. Better, probably, is to power the Arduino from the 7.2V supply via a noise filtering resistor into the Arduino's Vin terminal. NBNBNB 7.2V input MUST be to Arduino Vin. Use a small series resistor from 7.2V to Vin and a large filter ...


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If all else fails, read The Manual The manual indicates that it is intended that the MS electronics may be operated by the Arduino power supply while using a separate external supply for the motor. Pages 37 to 39 explain about powering options. The Arduino and the shield interconnect all of : 3V, 5V, Vin. 3V may not be used by the shield. Arduino Vin to ...


2

The Motor Shield is for driving bare motors, not servos. Servos already include drive electronics and only require a PWM signal in order to control them, whereas the Motor Shield provides the drive electronics for bare motors.


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You don't need this shield to drive servo motors, they have their own controller, you need just a 5V power line, GND and digital output pin to generate a PWM and that's it. Usually Arduino has enough power to drive servo motors. This shield you are talking about is used for DC (direct current) and stepper motor. These motors need power gain and the shield ...


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