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10

You decide which rails are positive and which are negative when you connect them to the + an - from your power supply or battery. A breadboard isn't polarised per se. It's just a bunch of cross-connections inside a perforated plastic case. No active or passive components inside. Some manufacturers may choose to paint indications regarding where to connect ...


6

I figured out a way to do this without having to port the compiler to iOS. It only works with the arduino Yún, but the Yún can send code to other arduinos with an spi cable. Install an SSH app on your device so you can communicate with the arduino Using that, install Ino on your Yún, a command line arduino compiler Create a file, put your code in it, then ...


6

Android devices usually don't have a USB host: they expect to be connected to some smarter device like your computer. Same goes with Arduino. For this reason Arduino made the Mega ADK (that means Accessory Development Kit). Mega ADK and Due act as USB hosts and can be connected directly to your Android phone. If you already have a board, another option is ...


6

Without knowing your exact implementation details... You should be OK as long as you don't have multiple clients connected at the same time. You may think that there are multiple clients connected to your server, but the connection is closed after the resource is obtained by the client over a protocol.* The standard flow of a server on Arduino: A client ...


4

Not even close In light of 1 it doesn't matter Get a Pi if you want to do video


4

In some sources there is something going on as the importance of order of the application of roll,pitch and yaw. But I cannot understand why this is related. Take your right hand: point your thumb upwards, your index finger away from you, and your middle finger to the left. You now have a righthanded coordinate system: your thumb is the x axis, your index ...


3

As mentioned by @alex.forencich, SoftwareSerial is not designed to support simultaneous bi-directional communication. I found a link to AltSoftSerial library on Arduino site, and this lib seems to work properly in my setup. To convert from SoftwareSerial to AltSoftSerial you need to change the pins that HC-05 is connected to (on Arduino Uno these are pins ...


3

The simplest solution: it really depends. There are a couple of things to consider: Bluetooth would probably be the least professional to impliment. The easiest way to do this is with an app. You can impliment it into your application with this: Let your own Android application receive data from Arduino by listening to the "primavera.arduino.intent....


3

Solution 1 If you don't want to change the coverage radius, sadly none of them would help you to achieve a coverage of 50m. But if you are not using a camera feed and just want to control, I think RF transceiver would be best solution for you. But to implement this you mist connect an Arduino Mega ADK to your android device. Serially receive your ...


3

These steps will allow your Android device to function as an Arduino Terminal. Download a Serial Terminal app. I'm using Android Hyperterminal, English version. Attach an OTG ("On The Go") cable to your Android device. Attach your Arduino to the OTG using your regular USB cable. Make sure the terminal program is set to the same baud rate as your sketch. ...


3

You never mentioned your tablet model... or Arduino model There are some tablets designed to work with USB flash drives and printers. This is called OTG (on the go. You need: A tablet supporting OTG An OTG adapter that fits into your tablets USB slot and is compatible The Arduino Uno Communicator App Arduino Uno (or clone) [Note: It says that it works ...


3

As gre_gor said. A simple breadboard contains of rows and columns of connections but sometimes for convenience manufacturer marks or prints Positive and Negative symbol along the row as they are usually used to power a circuit


3

I bet your problem has nothing to do with “smoothness” (whatever that means), but is entirely due to lack of message framing. The serial and bluetooth links do not transmit messages: they transmit only a stream of bytes, with no built-in notion of where a message ends and the next one starts. Relying on the timing of the received bytes to tell the messages ...


3

I don't think your code is correct: void loop () { if (blueTooth.available()) Serial.write(blueTooth.read()); if (blueTooth.available()) <---- blueTooth.write(Serial.read()); } Shouldn't you be monitoring Serial.available on this line?


2

You can always upload to the Arduino via Bluetooth. You must have a bluetooth chip/shield (any should do) and a PC that has bluetooth (or a table that can compile, most likely an Android tablet) You must change the BT baud rate to the same as normal arduino upload, which is 19200 (default BT baud is 9600). Connect the BT to Pin 0 and 1 so act the same as ...


2

Unfortunately Apple doesn't allow apps that implement programming languages. This being said, it is unclear why they would not allow an app that has to do with the Arduino IDE due to the fact that the code doesn't actually run on the Ipad itself. See here for more Info. As far as an Android IDE, I have heard that there are a few people working on ...


2

You bet it's possible. I used a pretty cheap bluetooth module that I got from Amazon, and wrote an app using the information on the official Android Developers page to connect to the Arduino. There are many guides online telling you how to hook up a module to the pins of the duino. You can probably get a cheaper module if you look on eBay and don't care ...


2

DC motors are typically driven with some sort of BJT/MOSFET solution that will be able to sink enough current to drive the motor because a microcontroller pin can only usually provide a few mA of power. See this link for info on basic microcontroller DC motor control. If slow response is acceptable and only one level of power is required (i.e. no PWM) even ...


2

If I could comment on this, I would say that this question really sounds like you haven't actually done any research to look into a solution. But, in simple terms: Arduino Uno, Android phone, GSM shield, contact sensor or limit switch The sensor or switch needs to be connected to an I/O pin on the Arduino, and will probably need to be connected to 5V. GSM(...


2

Using the library you linked should be a simple case of downloading the library's jar file from https://github.com/mik3y/usb-serial-for-android/releases and adding it as a reference/library/dependency (I forget what eclipse calls them) in your eclipse project. Then of course providing you connect with the right baud rates and so on it should work.


2

If I wanted to do this for a conventional Arduino I'd start by figuring out the operations against a serial API to talk to the bootloader, and perhaps test it against something exposing desktop serial ports to Java, as debugging Android host mode stuff is a pain given you have to use ADB-over-wifi. You might try to figure out how avrdude works, for example. ...


2

Your issue is probably this code (and similar) in the Android MainActivity: x = Integer.toString(u); Bluetooth.connectedThread.write(x); Remember that you are sending bytes, not ascii representations of them. For example, if the variable 'u' is 9, you would be sending the value 57. The larger problem is that if 'u' is 10 or higher, you are sending more ...


2

The USB protocol requires one end to be a "host" and the other end to be a "peripheral", and it doesn't work if the devices at both ends of the cable are "peripherals". Alas, most Arduinos and many early Android devices are "peripherals", so connecting such devices with a standard USB cable doesn't work. Some modern Android devices support "OTG", so in ...


2

There are two types of bluetooth devices for Arduino. Some are "slave" only and some are both "master or slave". There is little difference in price so you should buy one that is master or slave. This page (HC-05) describes one that appears to be commonly used but there are many and I do not have a recommendation. Some devices are in the form of small ...


2

You are missing the line termination you must send '\n' after your data in order to receive the data or use conexion.println(entrada) rather then conexion.write(entrada)


2

I've found the problem It should be: Serial1.println("2"); instead of: Serial1.write("2");


2

If you can properly bias your signal, say with a cap and a pot, you could read it with a digital input. You can then time the rising edges with micros(), either by polling the pin or using an interrupt. You could achieve greater accuracy by using the “input capture” feature of a 16-bit timer, if you are using an AVR-based Arduino and are not afraid of ...


2

There are several issues to consider: • Program downloading • HC-05 serial communication • Bluetooth pairing For the first issue: The serial-over-USB connection between the development computer and the Uno ties up the Uno's hardware serial RX and TX pins. There will be a conflict if the development computer transmits when the HC-05's TX is connected to ...


2

I played a lot with HC-05 and HC-06 until I understand the way they work. Now i've big Android App communicating with HC at 115200 bauds and sending and receving heavy data. I hope these tips will help you and other guys and save you time: 1) the way the HC-05 and HC-06 detect end of AT command is different: HC-05 (can be slave and master): each AT ...


2

How will i make arduino with gps to communicate with android app? i just need this for my school project. as gps is one-way communication, you will have to either launch your own birds capable of two way communications, or pick a different school.


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