-1

I am new to electronics and am currently working with an Arduino UNO. I know the basics of PCB manufacturing (Besides, I'm fiddling with mine, very basic of course) Anytime I'm curious about how to get from Arduino to a finished PCB with the same result only on my Arduino prototype?

For example, my project has several components such as leds, An RFID module, a TFT LCD Shield 3.5 ", another 240x320 OLED screen ... How to put all this on a printed circuit board?

Do I need to solder the same components to my PCB? -Do I need to run my Arduino code on my PCB once it is assembled? -.......................................

closed as off-topic by Dmitry Grigoryev, VE7JRO, MichaelT, MatsK, jose can u c May 22 at 13:33

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question does not appear to be about Arduino, within the scope defined in the help center." – VE7JRO, MichaelT, MatsK
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • put it all in a box – Juraj May 20 at 10:19
  • No, I want my own PCB without Arduino inside! Arduino just serves me for prototyping and see how it all works. I just wanted to know about my program for example my RFID module on an Arduino and then I want to wear it on my PCB how to do it without Arduino is integrated into the device I want to create! – Anubis May 20 at 10:56
3

A printed PCB can be used to place your components on (typically resistors, ICs, capacitors etc).

However, if you want to connect an LCD or big components, it would be a waste of space for your PCB. So in that case, I guess the best way is to create an enclosure where your displays fit in (and your RFID module if it is big too), and create some kind of connector from the PCB (e.g. using a terminal block or other way) and connect it to your displays.

On your PCB also an Arduino needs to be added, I guess the best solution is to use the Arduino chip (AtMega328P probably), and some external circuitry needed. Optionally using an IC socket in case you want to change the program later on.

On some Arduinos you can take out the AtMega328 DIP28 IC from your Arduino Uno board. Program it, than place it in the socket on your PCB board.

Update

Maybe you can use an Arduino Micro or Nano and place that directly onto your PCB (with headers preferably). Than you get something like below:

enter image description here

  • is there any way to make my own 100% PCB without component but that works exactly like my prototype on Arduino? – Anubis May 20 at 10:00
  • What do you mean without component? Without components like resistors/capacitors/etc? Or without an AtMega IC? For the first, I doubt, for the second, that depends if you can convert your software code into hardware components; if your code is using a library or has some formulas or using a communication protocol, it will be very hard. There are very many transistors in your AtMega and you don't want to copy those with separate components... What is the problem using an AtMega on your PCB? – Michel Keijzers May 20 at 10:13
  • Did you think about using e.g. an Arduino Nano or Micro instead? Than you can place one of those directly on your PCB (with a socket preferably). – Michel Keijzers May 20 at 10:14
  • I have no problem inserting an AtMega chip on my PCB it's just that I thought I could program my own microcontroller! I do not think the PCBs we have (those of our old electronic devices do not have arduino micro or nano inside). So I told myself that I could program everything myself but my concern is that it will work as well as my prototype or I will have things changed! – Anubis May 20 at 10:26
  • I doubt it will be easy to make your own microcontroller .... if you post your sketch someone can check if it is feasible. – Michel Keijzers May 20 at 10:29
0

" Optionally using an IC socket in case you want to change the program later on." No need, put an FTDI header on for serial programming, or put an ICSP header on and use a Programmer to program via the SPI pins.

Making your own PCB is very straightforward. I use EAGLE CAD software and design boards all the time. To duplicate a Promini for example, one only needs a '328P, 16 MHz xtal, two 22pF caps, 4 0.1uF caps, and a 10K resistor. Then the 2 headers for convenient bootloading and/or programming. Bootload and program it just like it was an Uno.

  • Thanks for this very good alternative, upvoted. – Michel Keijzers May 20 at 19:20

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.