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I'm newbie about Arduino. Can i build arduino robot wheels using Canon/Epson Cartridge inkjet printer?

The idea is like Drawing Robot enter image description here

but i want to use cartridge printer instead of using a pen.

so after searching, and it look like ZUtAPocketPrinter

enter image description here

The Drawing Robot is using Trinket Pro And ZUtAPocketPrinter is using Arduino (don't know using Uno/Nano/etc)

Can I use Trinket Pro or what types of arduino that i can use (Uno, Nano)?

And what hardware, sensor that require to scan/measure size of the paper?

And if there is tutorial, please share the link.

closed as off-topic by jose can u c, Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams, Majenko, Michel Keijzers, user31481 Aug 30 '17 at 15:29

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question does not appear to be about Arduino, within the scope defined in the help center." – jose can u c, Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams, Michel Keijzers
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • Now I understand your predicament. – user31481 Aug 30 '17 at 17:44
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Usually a robot uses 2 identical motors for drive in order to change directions or go straight. Usually a printer will only have 1 motor to drive the paper and 1 motor to drive the print head. And usually they are not identical. Making it difficult to build a useful robot. Also, printers usually use stepping motors. Most people building their first (small) robot usually use continuous servo motors. This makes for an easy to build first (small) robot as seen in this picture:

enter image description here

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    You have to check your answer against the revised OP's question. He really wants to make a real logo turtle -like that use printer ink cartridges instead of pens. – user31481 Aug 30 '17 at 17:51
  • But the OP already marked the answer as correct. Also, it has become more apparent that the OP is looking for an opinion. Many people will not like that as it solicits discussions instead a clear question and a concise answer. Stackexchange works best when the OP builds something, then comes and asks why something does not work. – st2000 Aug 31 '17 at 5:30

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