5

After debugging and having some conflicting declarations about analog pins, I finally thought it was done, after compiling I got this error:

32:0,
1:
31:12: error: expected unqualified-id before numeric constant


2:5: note: in expansion of macro 'B1'

I can't understand what this means. What's wrong with my code down here?

// don't judge me if it's too long and overcomplicated :P I'm still new xD
int AA1 = 0;
int B1 = 1;
int C1 = 2;
int D1 = 3;
int AA2 = 4;
int B2 = 5;
int C2 = 6;
int AA3 = 8;
int B3 = 9;
int C3 = 10;
int D3 = 11;
int B4 = 12;
int C4 = 13;
int sec = 0;
int min1 = 0;
int min2 = 0;
int hour1 = 8;
bool hour2 = 0;

void setup() {
  pinMode(AA1, OUTPUT);
  pinMode(B1, OUTPUT);
  pinMode(C1, OUTPUT);
  pinMode(D1, OUTPUT);
  pinMode(AA2, OUTPUT);
  pinMode(B2, OUTPUT);
  pinMode(C2, OUTPUT);
  pinMode(AA3, OUTPUT);
  pinMode(B3, OUTPUT);
  pinMode(C3, OUTPUT);
  pinMode(D3, OUTPUT);
  pinMode(B4, OUTPUT);
  pinMode(C4, OUTPUT);
}

void loop() {
  OutputOn();
  delay(1000);
  sec++;
  if(sec == 60) {
    sec = 0;
    min1++;
      if(min1 == 10) {
      min1 = 0;
      min2++;
        if(min2 == 6) {
        min2 = 0;
        hour1++;
          if(hour1 == 10) {
          hour1 = 0;
          hour2 = 1;
        }
        if(hour2 == 1, hour1 == 3) {
          hour1 = 1;
          hour2 = 0;
        }
      }
    }
  }
}

void OutputOn() {
  digitalWrite(B1, LOW);
  digitalWrite(C1, LOW);
  digitalWrite(D1, LOW);
  digitalWrite(A2, LOW);
  digitalWrite(B2, LOW);
  digitalWrite(C2, LOW);
  digitalWrite(A3, LOW);
  digitalWrite(B3, LOW);
  digitalWrite(C3, LOW);
  digitalWrite(D3, LOW);
  digitalWrite(B4, LOW);
  digitalWrite(C4, LOW);
  if(min1 == 1) { digitalWrite(AA1, HIGH); }
  if(min1 == 2) { digitalWrite(B1, HIGH); }
  if(min1 == 3) { digitalWrite(B1, HIGH); digitalWrite(AA1, HIGH); }
  if(min1 == 4) { digitalWrite(C1, HIGH); }
  if(min1 == 5) { digitalWrite(C1, HIGH); digitalWrite(AA1, HIGH); }
  if(min1 == 6) { digitalWrite(D1, HIGH); digitalWrite(B1, HIGH); }
  if(min1 == 7) { digitalWrite(D1, HIGH); digitalWrite(AA1, HIGH); digitalWrite(B1, HIGH); }
  if(min1 == 8) { digitalWrite(D1, HIGH); }
  if(min1 == 9) { digitalWrite(D1, HIGH); digitalWrite(AA1, HIGH); }
  if(min2 == 1) { digitalWrite(AA2, HIGH); }
  if(min2 == 2) { digitalWrite(B2, HIGH); }
  if(min2 == 3) { digitalWrite(B2, HIGH); digitalWrite(AA1, HIGH); }
  if(min2 == 4) { digitalWrite(C2, HIGH); }
  if(min2 == 5) { digitalWrite(C2, HIGH); digitalWrite(A2, HIGH); }
  if(min2 == 6) { digitalWrite(C2, HIGH); digitalWrite(B2, HIGH); }
  if(hour1 == 1) { digitalWrite(AA3, HIGH); }
  if(hour1 == 2) { digitalWrite(B3, HIGH); }
  if(hour1 == 3) { digitalWrite(B3, HIGH); digitalWrite(AA3, HIGH); }
  if(hour1 == 4) { digitalWrite(C3, HIGH); }
  if(hour1 == 5) { digitalWrite(C3, HIGH); digitalWrite(AA3, HIGH); }
  if(hour1 == 6) { digitalWrite(C3, HIGH); digitalWrite(B3, HIGH); }
  if(hour1 == 7) { digitalWrite(C3, HIGH); digitalWrite(AA3, HIGH); digitalWrite(B3, HIGH); }
  if(hour1 == 8) { digitalWrite(D3, HIGH); }
  if(hour1 == 9) { digitalWrite(D3, HIGH); digitalWrite(C3, HIGH); }
  if(hour2 == 1) { digitalWrite(B4, HIGH); digitalWrite(C4, HIGH); }
}

It's supposed to be code for a clock (if it wasn't obvious enough) hooked up to 4 7-segment decoders, also connected to 4 7-segment LED displays.

  • In general when writing in C, “macro” should be a big hint that you have a problem involving #define. Bizzare errors saying things that are not what you wrote: problem involving #define. – JDługosz May 29 '17 at 9:19
7

Bad luck. There is a file within Arduino called "binary.h", and it contains a define called "B1". Which means you may not use "B1" as a variable. In my opinion, that file "binary.h" is totally unnecessary.

In the preferences you can turn on extra output for the compiler and turn on line numbers. The compiler will tell what is wrong, but you have to know how the compiler does that. The first compiler error is the most important.

".../hardware/arduino/avr/cores/arduino/binary.h:31:12: error: expected unqualified-id before numeric constant #define B1 1" means that the compiler was reading the file "binary.h" and at line 31 it noticed something it did not understand and it has to do with "B1".

  • So I just have to not use B1? – Dudamesh 192 May 30 '17 at 1:16
  • Correct. The leading B with 0's and 1's is used for binary constants: arduino.cc/en/Reference/IntegerConstants Since it is a pin number, you can call the variable "const B1Pin = 1;" or even "const TheyToldMeAtStackExchangeNotToCallThisB1 = 1;" – Jot May 30 '17 at 7:16
  • I ment: "const int B1Pin = 1;". Sorry, I forgot the 'int'. The 'const' keyword is not needed, it tells the compiler that it is a constant number and does not change. – Jot May 31 '17 at 1:44

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