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I am trying to connect my Solar Panel (array of 2 x 265Wp 24v panels connected in series) to my Arduino UNO R3/Nano so that I can make a current/voltage measurement system that can be connected to the internet for remote data access.

I am not sure if an Allegro ACS712 30Amp chip could handle the voltage/current of my system which is usually over 60v dc and 4-5 amps. I can relate the ACS712 to a simple ammeter which is connected in series of the load where a shunt resistance is used between the two connecting ends of the ammeter.

The confusing part here for me is that the solar panel is connected via an MPPT charge controller to my 1.5 KVA inverter which in turn powers my house equipment, and I am not sure if the two connecting ends of the ACS712 can handle this load (which sometime exceeds to over 450 Wh) if connected in between the wire connecting the panel and charge controller.

Can anyone help me with a suggestion or better with a diagram showing the suggested system.

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    The question might be better suited to the Electronics SE. – Code Gorilla Mar 13 '17 at 13:00
  • the ACS712 is not based on shunts, it's based on the Hall-effect, like a clamp meter. – dandavis Mar 14 '17 at 18:30
  • If you're going to post a question about a specific part, always post a link to the datasheet you're using. (If you're not using a datasheet, go find one and read it!) Making people hunt around for the specs for your part is a good way to discourage them from answering. – Curt J. Sampson Apr 29 '17 at 13:31
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I am not sure if an Allegro ACS712 30Amp chip could handle the voltage/current of my system which is usually over 60v dc and 4-5 amps.

Easily. It's designed for mains voltages up to 30A. You're using a fraction of that. You could even use the 20A version to get more accuracy and resolution.

The confusing part here for me is that the solar panel is connected via an MPPT charge controller to my 1.5 KVA inverter which in turn powers my house equipment, and I am not sure if the two connecting ends of the ACS712 can handle this load (which sometime exceeds to over 450 Wh) if connected in between the wire connecting the panel and charge controller.

Why is that confusing? If you're monitoring the feed between the solar panel and the charge controller what comes out of that system at the other end is of no concern. Just because you are drawing a larger current from the output doesn't mean that the solar panels are providing that current - that comes from the batteries. Now if you were monitoring the current to/from the batteries that would be a different matter. You'd need to calculate the peak current that your house would draw at mains voltage then convert that to the current at the battery voltage (converting to watts in between is a good step. Note that Wh is meaningless when you want a peak value - Wh is a total power over a period of time ["area under a curve"], but you don't care about time, only peak ["maximum value of curve"]).

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