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I have worked with Arduino before, but not with WiFi modules. I always used RF or other methods.

Now I am working on a project where i need to connect two UNOs, over long distance, but they will have a continuous internet connection.

One board with only send data, and one will only receive.

Will the esp8266 soc suffice for this? They will have fast network connection; at least 4g speeds. So can I send and receive real time data over the internet, and receive it fast? It should feel like there is no delay on the receiving side. Can I do this with the ESP, and if so, can any one point me towards the right material to get started.

thx in advance :)

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    i don't see why you need the unos for this, just use two ESPs to keep cost and complexity to a minimum.
    – dandavis
    Feb 23 '17 at 19:35
  • How long is a "long" distance?
    – sa_leinad
    Feb 24 '17 at 4:17
  • need two uno as one is connected to a senor which gives analog output,whicle the other is used to control a screen(LCDor led)and a few servos.long distance means communication over the internet. Feb 24 '17 at 4:23
  • The ESP8266 has one analog port and and supports SPI and I2C which will let you connect to a range of ADC devices. Look at the ESP8266 12E of 12F. Feb 27 '17 at 13:26
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The ESPs are easy to work with and more than capable, BUT (there's always a "but"): with a public network in the middle, latency, routing, and traffic issues will be beyond your control. Look, for instance, at the variability in page load times when loading over the internet.

If you use an IoT server in the middle, there will be server delays outside your control as well, though connecting to a common server from both ends can make it much easier to get everything talking for the first time. (There may, however, be data-rate limits imposed on you if the server in the middle is a free service.)

So can I send and receive real time data over the internet, and receive it fast?

Define "real fast". Do you mean "really quickly" (short delay from start of transmission to start of reception at the other end)? Or "really high throughput" (moving lots of data in a short time, or continuously without falling behind? Or something else?

Since you're working with an Uno, if you need to use a SoftwareSerial port to talk to the ESP, the SS will be limited to 9600 baud (equivalent to 960 Bytes/sec) and your ability to push data through it to somewhat under that. If you can use the built-in hardware UART your data-rate to/from an ESP can be much higher, at least 115200 baud or 11,520 B/sec (again, gross rate; rate of pushing data will be somewhat lower).

tl;dr: The network will be a much greater limitation than the ESP devices.

Update:

the problem i see is the delay with communication over the internet between the two uno if i use a server.can i communicate between the two with out the use of a server

Of course. Using an intermediate server might be a useful step on the way to getting your devices to talk directly. It would allow you to focus on the clients themselves at first and leave (most of) the networking issues to work out later. But you'll still have the issues of any network and especially a public network. If you have no other choice, you build it and you get whatever you get for performance. How serious are the consequence of a delay or a lost packet? Inconvenience? Delayed system functions? Will it cost someone money? Could someone get hurt? Could someone die? How dire the consequences could be will determine how stringent (and expensive) your solution has to be and what backups might have to be in place.

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  • thx for ur reply, 9600 baud should suffice (need to practically check),but the problem i see is the delay with communication over the internet between the two uno if i use a server.can i communicate between the two with out the use of a server Feb 24 '17 at 4:28
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Have you considered using Particle Photons instead? They're $19, wifi enabled, Arduino compatible and they come with a very extensive cloud API functions that will allow you to pass information between them really easily: https://docs.particle.io/reference/firmware/photon/

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  • looks promising but its too costly. Feb 23 '17 at 18:34

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