1

EDIT :

I have plenty of weird bugs. I will open another thread, and come back to this one when I have better understanding, rather than completely modify this one halway through. Sorry to every answerer for my electronic incompetence which led me to ask the wrong questions; I hope the other thread makes more sense.

I have recently exhumed an arduino from a cupboard, and can't seem to make even a blinking LED circuit work correctly.

Here's the sketch :

void setup() {
  pinMode(9, OUTPUT);
}

void loop() {
  digitalWrite(9, HIGH);
  delay(1000);            
  digitalWrite(9, LOW);   
  delay(1000);              
}

This has been tried without the circuit, on pin 13, using the onboard LED, and it worked.

However, using the following circuit, it did not result in a blinking LED, using several pins (8, 9, 12, 13) and LEDS.

May I assume the arduino is fried?

Here is a thumbnail of the circuit : circuit picture

5
  • What happens if you plug the white jumper into 5V rather than the current digital pin 12 ?
    – Bra1n
    Mar 31 '16 at 14:06
  • The LED doesn't light. I also just tested the LEDs with 3 x 1.5 batteries, and they are functional.
    – pouzzler
    Mar 31 '16 at 14:07
  • Was the battery test using the circuit as above ? If so which pole of the battery was connected to the white lead ?
    – Bra1n
    Mar 31 '16 at 14:12
  • Positive. Anyways, I tested several pins, and inverted the led poles on each test, just to be sure; measure thrice, cut once ;)
    – pouzzler
    Mar 31 '16 at 14:41
  • Is it just me, or that resistor looks odd? What is its value? Can you measure it with a multimeter? Did you try changing the holes on the breadboard?
    – frarugi87
    Apr 1 '16 at 9:30
1

Here's a guide posted by Nick Gammon for checking if your Arduino is bricked Is My Arduino Bricked ?

1
  • I will read this guide; thank you for the link.
    – pouzzler
    Mar 31 '16 at 21:00
0

Try lighting up the LED without using any resistance in the middle, if that doesn't work try with a LED which consumes less current even if that doesn't work put the pin to HIGH state in code and measure the voltage of the given pin using a multimeter it should read above 3.3V. If neither of these work then you can be sure that your arduino is fried

3
  • Measuring between ground and that pin, is that correct?
    – pouzzler
    Mar 31 '16 at 20:09
  • Yes, Measure between the ground and the pin Mar 31 '16 at 20:37
  • I put a LED between GND and the pin directly in the arduino, and it worked
    – pouzzler
    Mar 31 '16 at 21:00
0

You haven't exactly got the LED connected to pin 9, as in the code, have you?

I find it hard to believe that you can upload new sketches, but none of the pins work. Try pins 0 or 1, in the sketch, for example. Or the whole lot:

void setup() {
  for (int i = 0; i < 20; i++)
    pinMode (i, OUTPUT);
}

void loop() {
  for (int i = 0; i < 20; i++)
  {
    digitalWrite(i, HIGH);
    delay(1000);
    digitalWrite(i, LOW);
    delay(1000);
  }
}

Now methodically test every pin.


What happens if you plug the white jumper into 5V rather than the current digital pin 12

The LED doesn't light.

Something's wrong with your testing. The processor cannot be powering up, and accepting new sketches, yet not have power to the +5V pin.

1
  • you're going to have to wait 40 seconds (worst case) for one blink? I would advise setting all pins HIGH, then put a delay, then put all pins LOW and put a delay again. (Instead of putting a delay between each set)
    – Paul
    Apr 1 '16 at 9:33
0

It it possible the non-working LED got wired backward (it wouldn't be the first time!)? If the LED is clear enough, hold it up to the light and look inside the plastic bubble. There will be two bits of metal, one attached to each lead. One of them is significantly larger than the other; that's the cathode and it needs to be connected to the more negative side of the circuit. Here's a picture.

0

My arduino is not bricked, I just don't know how many things I don't understand about electronics, and make every single mistake I can make, especially while cabling.

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