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What are the most common ways of destroying a Arduino using the I/O pins?

Also, in what situation would it be acceptable to attach the positive or negative end of a power supply to an I/O pin?

  • 2
    putting a small firework under the micro and connecting an electronic match to a pin is a spectacular way to destroy and arduino using the I/O pins – frarugi87 Nov 11 '15 at 17:03
  • Do the I/O pins have to be from the same Arduino we're trying to destroy? Or can they be from a different device? – Jerry Nov 13 '15 at 14:07
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There are many ways to destroy an Arduino, check out this article, 10 Ways to Destroy An Arduino.

  1. Shorting I/O Pins to Ground
  2. Shorting I/O Pins to Each Other
  3. Apply Overvoltage to I/O Pins
  4. Apply External Vin Power Backwards
  5. Apply >5V to the 5V Connector Pin
  6. Apply >3.3V to the 3.3V Connector Pin
  7. Short Vin to GND
  8. Apply 5V External Power with Vin Load
  9. Apply >13V to the Reset Pin
  10. Exceed Total Microcontroller Current
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What are the most common ways of destroying a Arduno using the I/O pins?

Over-voltage and over-current.

Over-voltage involves putting too high (or too low) a voltage onto an IO pin. Over-current involves trying to source (or sink) too much current through an IO pin. Both can be fatal.

Also, in what situation would it be acceptable to attach the positive or negative end of a power supply to an I/O pin?

"Positive": When that power supply is no more than 5V and shares ground with the Arduino and you want to know if it's on or not, or measure the voltage (Analog Input). Anything more than 5V will require a voltage divider to bring the voltage down to 5V.

"Negative": If by that you mean the ground terminal, and that ground terminal is shared with the Arduino ground, then you can do it any time - but why would you, since you'd just be connecting to the Arduino ground since they are one and the same. If it's not the ground terminal but a potential below ground, then never unless you use some circuitry to raise that potential above ground for measuring it.

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