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Following one of the article from 2013 :

Before you start hammering that “add to shopping cart” button, note that the general impression around the web seems to be that the Leonardo still has a few bugs that need ironing out, and isn’t quite as beginner friendly as the Uno. For builders already familiar with Arduino, this is the better deal.

The question is if Leonardo is still buggy and may cause any confusion to newbie Arduino programmers. Furthermore, Leonardo doesn't have removable chip, so how can one transfer the project into a separate processor and use Arduino to the other project?

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The question is if Leonardo is still buggy

Probably.

and may cause any confusion to newbie Arduino programmers.

Definitely. The whole way the Leonardo works is very different to the likes of the Uno. Transitioning from one to the other, if you don't know what the differences really mean, can be confusing.

Furthermore, Leonardo doesn't have removable chip, so how can one transfer the project into a separate processor and use Arduino to the other project?

You build your circuit on a PCB and you provide an ICSP header. ICSP stands for In Circuit Serial Programming. You then use a hardware programmer to install either the Leonardo bootloader, which can then be used to install sketches through USB, or install a sketch direct without the bootloader.

Or, if you're making thousands of them you send your code to Atmel and they burn it to the chip in the factory for you - at a price of course.

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