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I'm using a simple IR receiver connected to the Arduino through A0 analog pin. The problem is that I want to stabilize the output of IR receiver when it's not receiving an IR signal from a specific IR source, or at least minimizing the disruption to a specific range that I can handle, no matter where its position, But in my case moving the IR receiver a few inches in any direction will results in different voltage output. the difference between values on disruption is very random to handle.

What can I do to isolate IR receiver, may be a specific material or a specific color?

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  • What receiver are you using? If you read this comparison they mentioned that one of the receivers would give random pulses from the sunlight.
    – rslite
    Apr 16 '15 at 2:30
  • speaking of sunlight, when I was experiment with the IR receiver in my room, I didn't expect that the sunlight can cause such a huge disruption, I had to close my window, the output now is much more stabilized, but still there's a small disruption that I want to minimize it as much as I can.
    – AWTahhan
    Apr 16 '15 at 14:52
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I would suggest two things. First You could put electrical tape around the receiver in such a way that it will only pick up signals from a certain direction. Also you could use low and high pass filters to accept input only in the 38khz range(range of most infra red remotes). Keep in mind that you will need a couple of rounds for it to work effectively.

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  • Filtering is a good idea (if not already implemented in the receiver package) however it should be noted that even with filters, some will output spurious pulses. Software may be the best place to reject those - rejecting ones which occur in isolation are easy, recovering intended transmissions that have noise spikes in them is trickier, but generally still possible. Apr 17 '15 at 19:36
  • Thanks a lot Einstein Jr, putting electrical tape and setting transmitting frequency to 38khz solved my problem, it's may be useful to mention that I needed several rounds of electrical tape around my IR receiver to isolate it entirely from disruption.
    – AWTahhan
    Apr 21 '15 at 19:35
  • Glad I could help. I editted my answer with your suggestions.
    – NULL
    Apr 21 '15 at 22:02
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Ir receiver should not be connected to an analog input but digital

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    That's not necessarily true. It depends on the type of receiver and its intended purpose. You are right in that generally the ones with a 38 KHz filter/decoder on-board have a digital output, but a simple receiver such as an IR phototransistor would be an analog device. Apr 17 '15 at 19:35
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    Welcome to Arduino SE! Can you please edit your post to include more details on why and how so this is helpful relevant for future visitors? Thanks! Apr 18 '15 at 4:26

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