3 [added2] section added; added 26 characters in body; added 39 characters in body
source | link

In the official Arduino examples, a servo motor is powered by the 5V pin of the Arduino board. In real life, that is a bad idea.
Your FS5106B has specified about 1A stall current. The average current is less than that, but the start peak current could indeed be 1A.
Could you try to use a seperate power supply of 5V (or 6V) for the servo motor ?

To check if the Arduino resets, you could do a Serial.begin(9600); in setup, directly followed by Serial.println("the sketch has started");

Some servo motors require different timing. That would not explain the 13 seconds delay, so I assume that your servo motor has normal timing.

Do you use a breadboard ? Sending a current peak through a breadboard (with bad contacts) can cause a lot of voltage spikes.

(To the other problem solvers: I'm ignoring the 13 seconds and assume that once in a while the servo motor is able to start, just a guess, I could be wrong).

[ADDED]
@ChrisStratton is trying to tell you this:

void setup()
{
  pinMode( LED_BUILTIN, OUTPUT); 
}

void loop()
{
  digitalWrite( LED_BUILTIN, HIGH);
  delay(1000); 
  digitalWrite( LED_BUILTIN, LOW);
  delay(1000);
}

The next step would be:

#include <Servo.h>

Servo servo;

void setup()
{
  Serial.begin(9600);
  Serial.println("The sketch has started");
  pinMode( LED_BUILTIN, OUTPUT);
  servo.attach(10); 
}

void loop()
{
  servo.write(0);
  digitalWrite( LED_BUILTIN, HIGH);
  delay(1000);

  servo.write(180);
  digitalWrite( LED_BUILTIN, LOW);
  delay(1000);
}

[ADDED2]
Or even more fun, with a counter (as @ChrisStratton wrote):

#include <Servo.h>

Servo servo;

unsigned int counter;

void setup()
{
  Serial.begin(9600);
  Serial.println("The sketch has started");
  pinMode( LED_BUILTIN, OUTPUT);
  servo.attach(10); 
}

void loop()
{
  servo.write(0);
  digitalWrite( LED_BUILTIN, HIGH);
  delay(1000);

  servo.write(180);
  digitalWrite( LED_BUILTIN, LOW);
  delay(1000);

  Serial.print("Still alive after ");
  Serial.print(counter);
  Serial.println(" seconds");
  counter += 2;   // two seconds per loop iteration
}

In the official Arduino examples, a servo motor is powered by the 5V pin of the Arduino board. In real life, that is a bad idea.
Your FS5106B has specified about 1A stall current. The average current is less than that, but the start peak current could indeed be 1A.
Could you try to use a seperate power supply of 5V (or 6V) for the servo motor ?

To check if the Arduino resets, you could do a Serial.begin(9600); in setup, directly followed by Serial.println("the sketch has started");

Some servo motors require different timing. That would not explain the 13 seconds delay, so I assume that your servo motor has normal timing.

Do you use a breadboard ? Sending a current peak through a breadboard (with bad contacts) can cause a lot of voltage spikes.

(To the other problem solvers: I'm ignoring the 13 seconds and assume that once in a while the servo motor is able to start, just a guess, I could be wrong).

[ADDED]
@ChrisStratton is trying to tell you this:

void setup()
{
  pinMode( LED_BUILTIN, OUTPUT); 
}

void loop()
{
  digitalWrite( LED_BUILTIN, HIGH);
  delay(1000); 
  digitalWrite( LED_BUILTIN, LOW);
  delay(1000);
}

The next step would be:

#include <Servo.h>

Servo servo;

void setup()
{
  Serial.begin(9600);
  Serial.println("The sketch has started");
  pinMode( LED_BUILTIN, OUTPUT);
  servo.attach(10); 
}

void loop()
{
  servo.write(0);
  digitalWrite( LED_BUILTIN, HIGH);
  delay(1000);

  servo.write(180);
  digitalWrite( LED_BUILTIN, LOW);
  delay(1000);
}

In the official Arduino examples, a servo motor is powered by the 5V pin of the Arduino board. In real life, that is a bad idea.
Your FS5106B has specified about 1A stall current. The average current is less than that, but the start peak current could indeed be 1A.
Could you try to use a seperate power supply of 5V (or 6V) for the servo motor ?

To check if the Arduino resets, you could do a Serial.begin(9600); in setup, directly followed by Serial.println("the sketch has started");

Some servo motors require different timing. That would not explain the 13 seconds delay, so I assume that your servo motor has normal timing.

Do you use a breadboard ? Sending a current peak through a breadboard (with bad contacts) can cause a lot of voltage spikes.

(To the other problem solvers: I'm ignoring the 13 seconds and assume that once in a while the servo motor is able to start, just a guess, I could be wrong).

[ADDED]
@ChrisStratton is trying to tell you this:

void setup()
{
  pinMode( LED_BUILTIN, OUTPUT); 
}

void loop()
{
  digitalWrite( LED_BUILTIN, HIGH);
  delay(1000); 
  digitalWrite( LED_BUILTIN, LOW);
  delay(1000);
}

The next step would be:

#include <Servo.h>

Servo servo;

void setup()
{
  Serial.begin(9600);
  Serial.println("The sketch has started");
  pinMode( LED_BUILTIN, OUTPUT);
  servo.attach(10); 
}

void loop()
{
  servo.write(0);
  digitalWrite( LED_BUILTIN, HIGH);
  delay(1000);

  servo.write(180);
  digitalWrite( LED_BUILTIN, LOW);
  delay(1000);
}

[ADDED2]
Or even more fun, with a counter (as @ChrisStratton wrote):

#include <Servo.h>

Servo servo;

unsigned int counter;

void setup()
{
  Serial.begin(9600);
  Serial.println("The sketch has started");
  pinMode( LED_BUILTIN, OUTPUT);
  servo.attach(10); 
}

void loop()
{
  servo.write(0);
  digitalWrite( LED_BUILTIN, HIGH);
  delay(1000);

  servo.write(180);
  digitalWrite( LED_BUILTIN, LOW);
  delay(1000);

  Serial.print("Still alive after ");
  Serial.print(counter);
  Serial.println(" seconds");
  counter += 2;   // two seconds per loop iteration
}
2 added a [ADDED] section
source | link

In the official Arduino examples, a servo motor is powered by the 5V pin of the Arduino board. In real life, that is a bad idea.
Your FS5106B has specified about 1A stall current. The average current is less than that, but the start peak current could indeed be 1A.
Could you try to use a seperate power supply of 5V (or 6V) for the servo motor ?

To check if the Arduino resets, you could do a Serial.begin(9600); in setup, directly followed by Serial.println("the sketch has started");

Some servo motors require different timing. That would not explain the 13 seconds delay, so I assume that your servo motor has normal timing.

Do you use a breadboard ? Sending a current peak through a breadboard (with bad contacts) can cause a lot of voltage spikes.

(To the other problem solvers: I'm ignoring the 13 seconds and assume that once in a while the servo motor is able to start, just a guess, I could be wrong).

[ADDED]
@ChrisStratton is trying to tell you this:

void setup()
{
  pinMode( LED_BUILTIN, OUTPUT); 
}

void loop()
{
  digitalWrite( LED_BUILTIN, HIGH);
  delay(1000); 
  digitalWrite( LED_BUILTIN, LOW);
  delay(1000);
}

The next step would be:

#include <Servo.h>

Servo servo;

void setup()
{
  Serial.begin(9600);
  Serial.println("The sketch has started");
  pinMode( LED_BUILTIN, OUTPUT);
  servo.attach(10); 
}

void loop()
{
  servo.write(0);
  digitalWrite( LED_BUILTIN, HIGH);
  delay(1000);

  servo.write(180);
  digitalWrite( LED_BUILTIN, LOW);
  delay(1000);
}

In the official Arduino examples, a servo motor is powered by the 5V pin of the Arduino board. In real life, that is a bad idea.
Your FS5106B has specified about 1A stall current. The average current is less than that, but the start peak current could indeed be 1A.
Could you try to use a seperate power supply of 5V (or 6V) for the servo motor ?

To check if the Arduino resets, you could do a Serial.begin(9600); in setup, directly followed by Serial.println("the sketch has started");

Some servo motors require different timing. That would not explain the 13 seconds delay, so I assume that your servo motor has normal timing.

Do you use a breadboard ? Sending a current peak through a breadboard (with bad contacts) can cause a lot of voltage spikes.

(To the other problem solvers: I'm ignoring the 13 seconds and assume that once in a while the servo motor is able to start, just a guess, I could be wrong).

In the official Arduino examples, a servo motor is powered by the 5V pin of the Arduino board. In real life, that is a bad idea.
Your FS5106B has specified about 1A stall current. The average current is less than that, but the start peak current could indeed be 1A.
Could you try to use a seperate power supply of 5V (or 6V) for the servo motor ?

To check if the Arduino resets, you could do a Serial.begin(9600); in setup, directly followed by Serial.println("the sketch has started");

Some servo motors require different timing. That would not explain the 13 seconds delay, so I assume that your servo motor has normal timing.

Do you use a breadboard ? Sending a current peak through a breadboard (with bad contacts) can cause a lot of voltage spikes.

(To the other problem solvers: I'm ignoring the 13 seconds and assume that once in a while the servo motor is able to start, just a guess, I could be wrong).

[ADDED]
@ChrisStratton is trying to tell you this:

void setup()
{
  pinMode( LED_BUILTIN, OUTPUT); 
}

void loop()
{
  digitalWrite( LED_BUILTIN, HIGH);
  delay(1000); 
  digitalWrite( LED_BUILTIN, LOW);
  delay(1000);
}

The next step would be:

#include <Servo.h>

Servo servo;

void setup()
{
  Serial.begin(9600);
  Serial.println("The sketch has started");
  pinMode( LED_BUILTIN, OUTPUT);
  servo.attach(10); 
}

void loop()
{
  servo.write(0);
  digitalWrite( LED_BUILTIN, HIGH);
  delay(1000);

  servo.write(180);
  digitalWrite( LED_BUILTIN, LOW);
  delay(1000);
}
1
source | link

In the official Arduino examples, a servo motor is powered by the 5V pin of the Arduino board. In real life, that is a bad idea.
Your FS5106B has specified about 1A stall current. The average current is less than that, but the start peak current could indeed be 1A.
Could you try to use a seperate power supply of 5V (or 6V) for the servo motor ?

To check if the Arduino resets, you could do a Serial.begin(9600); in setup, directly followed by Serial.println("the sketch has started");

Some servo motors require different timing. That would not explain the 13 seconds delay, so I assume that your servo motor has normal timing.

Do you use a breadboard ? Sending a current peak through a breadboard (with bad contacts) can cause a lot of voltage spikes.

(To the other problem solvers: I'm ignoring the 13 seconds and assume that once in a while the servo motor is able to start, just a guess, I could be wrong).